Oakland shooting suspect changed name from "Su"

WASHINGTON Thu Apr 5, 2012 5:37pm EDT

One Goh (L), accused of opening fire on former classmates and staff at Oikos University on April 2, 2012, appears in Alameda County Court for his arraignment in this April 4, 2012 courtroom sketch. REUTERS/Vicki Behringer (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW)

One Goh (L), accused of opening fire on former classmates and staff at Oikos University on April 2, 2012, appears in Alameda County Court for his arraignment in this April 4, 2012 courtroom sketch.

Credit: Reuters/Vicki Behringer (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW)

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The suspect in a California shooting rampage that killed seven people and wounded three had changed his name because he thought "Su" sounded like a girl's name, according to a court document.

The suspect, One Goh, 43, was born Su Nam Ko in South Korea but changed it in February 2002 when he lived in Falls Church, Virginia, the Fairfax County Circuit Court filing showed.

"I do not like my current name because it sounds like (a) girl's name," Goh wrote in the filing. A copy was obtained by Reuters.

Goh, a former nursing student, is accused of opening fire on staff and former classmates at Oakland's Oikos University, a small Christian school on Monday.

The attack was the deadliest gun violence at a U.S. college since a Virginia Tech University student killed 32 people and wounded 25 others before taking his own life in 2007.

Goh, who was described by some at Oikos as an outsider, was charged with seven counts of murder and three counts of attempted murder on Wednesday. He could face the death penalty.

Goh told investigators that he had gone to the school with a .45-caliber handgun and four magazines of ammunition, according to a police statement.

Oakland Police Chief Howard Jordan said on Tuesday the accused gunman had gone to the school intent on attacking an administrator and classmates he felt had treated him unfairly.

(Reporting By Ian Simpson)

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