Korean Christians aim to stop Lady Gaga's "pornographic" show

SEOUL Fri Apr 27, 2012 3:24pm EDT

Christians attend a prayer meeting against the concert of U.S. singer Lady Gaga, in front of the Olympic stadium in Seoul April 27, 2012. Christian groups called for a boycott of her show, which they say promotes homosexuality. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

Christians attend a prayer meeting against the concert of U.S. singer Lady Gaga, in front of the Olympic stadium in Seoul April 27, 2012. Christian groups called for a boycott of her show, which they say promotes homosexuality.

Credit: Reuters/Kim Hong-Ji

SEOUL (Reuters) - Christian groups in South Korea called on Friday for pop icon Lady Gaga to cancel her concert here saying it was "pornographic" and promoted homosexuality.

South Korea's government has already bowed to public pressure and banned under-18s from attending the 26-year old's concert, but protesters gathered outside the venue said that was not enough.

"Some people can accept this as another culture but its impact is huge beyond art and debases religions. Even adults can't see her performance which is too homosexual and pornographic," said Yoon Jung-hoon, a reverend who organized the "Civilians Network against the Lady Gaga Concert".

The singer's hit song "Born This Way" celebrates the empowerment of gay men and women, something that many in South Korea, which is the second most Christian country in Asia after the Philippines, say is an immoral lifestyle.

Lady Gaga, whose real name is Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta, has been in Seoul for close on a week as she kicks off her Asian "Born this Way" tour.

"Nervous for tonight. Hope I make little monsters happy and proud," she Tweeted a few hours before the concert kicked off.

Yoon's group claims to have collected 5,000 supporters on Facebook against the concert and some have also called for a boycott of the sponsor Hyundai Card. The protesters have also threatened a boycott of its parent company, Hyundai Motor Co, South Korea's largest car-maker.

"The Christian Council of Korea with 12 million Christians and 55,000 churches will take all kinds of measures such as boycotting Hyundai Card to root out this kind of obscene culture," the council said in a statement.

Yoon said he would attend the concert to "monitor" the performance for homosexual content that could corrupt young people.

(Reporting by Ju-min Park; Editing by David Chance and Sanjeev Miglani)

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/
Comments (10)
olHarley wrote:
I hate saying unkind things about religion and I tend to really like all things Korean. But if Ms. Giamotta is pissing off the friendly folks who brought you Rev. Moon, and the Washington Times, I gotta think she’s a great and good thing, and they’re being self-righteous homophobic jerks. God bless and keep, (of all people) Lady Gaga!

Apr 27, 2012 6:23am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Jzhou wrote:
It is not about Christianity, rather than Korean men’s obnoxious, chauvinism.Just look recent US college campus massacre, Virginia Tech, Christian college in Oakland, more than 30 people shot indiscriminate by Korean men – for what?
The gun men had no friend, particular female friends, exhausting for their sex drive. Korean may have achieved economic growth in the last 30 years, but they never face one reality – Korean is the most racist, closed mind people in Asia. Go Lady Gaga!

Apr 27, 2012 8:26am EDT  --  Report as abuse
brightthings wrote:
Normally I mock religious nuts, but anything against mainstream trash music like Lady GaGarbage is fine with me

Apr 27, 2012 9:00am EDT  --  Report as abuse
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.