Greece opens detention camp for immigrants as election looms

ATHENS Sun Apr 29, 2012 6:08pm EDT

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ATHENS (Reuters) - Greece opened its first purpose-built detention centre for illegal migrants on Sunday in Athens, a week before a national election where illegal immigration has emerged as a key issue.

About 130,000 immigrants cross the country's porous sea and land borders every year, the vast majority via Turkey, and the authorities are forced to release those who are arrested because of a lack of permanent housing.

With Greece in its fifth year of recession and worries over rising crime levels, illegal immigration has become a major issue in the run up of the May 6 election.

The once-obscure far-right Golden Dawn, which wants to deport all immigrants, is among the parties that has benefitted most from the mood among voters, and is expected to win its first seats in parliament.

Greece's ruling Socialist PASOK and conservative rival New Democracy parties have also pledged to crack down on immigration to try to win over voters.

On Sunday, the first 56 immigrants were brought to the Amygdaleza detention camp in western Athens, a police official said. Dozens more are expected at the camp in the next few days, which can house up to 1,000 people, the official said.

Amygdaleza is the first of about 50 camps that Greek officials say will be built by mid-2013. It consists of dozens of containers that were originally set up to house people hit by natural disasters such as earthquakes.

"We are sending a message in every direction that the country is not unfenced anymore," Civil Protection Minister Mihalis Chrysohoidis said at a rally in Athens.

(Reporting by Angeliki Koutantou; Editing by Louise Ireland)

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Comments (1)
CountryPride wrote:
You mean to tell me the Greeks and other countries around the world are allowed to enforce their immigration laws to protect their citizens from illegal foreign criminal invaders? I thought we were supposed to just let them pour in endlessly and give them a free ride on the citizens backs and let them live above the law while the average citizen suffers at their expense. I guess that only happens in America the land where lunatics and crimmigration activists are in power and sue their own States for enforcing law and order.

Apr 30, 2012 8:37am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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