TREASURIES-Bonds fall on stronger U.S. factory data

Tue May 1, 2012 11:11am EDT

Related Topics

* April U.S. factory data strongest in 10 months
    * U.S. construction weaker-than-expected in March
    * Trading volume light due to May Day holiday
    * Treasuries recovered in April after weak Q1


    By Richard Leong	
    NEW YORK, May 1 (Reuters) - U.S. government debt prices fell
on Tuesday as the U.S. manufacturing sector unexpectedly grew at
its strongest pace in 10 months, reducing fears U.S. economy is
faltering and required more stimulus from the Federal Reserve.  	
    Benchmark yields, however, are still hovering at their
lowest levels in nearly three months on the perception that a
recession is spreading across Europe and the high U.S.
unemployment remains a drag on economic growth.	
    The Institute for Supply Management said its index on U.S.
nationwide factory activity rose to 54.8 in April, up from 53.4
in March. Economists had predicted ISM's factory activity index,
which the Fed monitors, likely slipped to 53.0 last month.
 	
    "This is a real positive for the economy because it's so
strong," James Newman, head of Treasuries and agency trading at
Keefe, Bruyette and Woods in New York, said of the latest U.S.
ISM factory report. "But it does come down to the jobs number on
Friday."	
    The U.S. Labor Department will release its April jobs survey
at 8:30 a.m. (1230 GMT) on Friday. Economists expect companies
likely added 170,000 jobs in April after a
disappointing 120,000 gain in March. 	
    A surprising weak government report on March payrolls, which
was followed by a slew of disappointing economic data, shook
investor confidence about the U.S. economy. It had shown signs
of gaining traction in January and February and spurred
speculation the Fed might consider stepping away from its ultra
loose monetary policy.	
    "People are concerned if you get another weak jobs report,
it would be a trend," Newman said.	
    The latest ISM data have stemmed fears of a rapid U.S.
economic deterioration. They followed mixed overseas readings,
which showed British factory output barely grew in April but
Chinese manufacturing growth accelerated at its fastest pace in
13 months.  	
    The unexpectedly acceleration in domestic factory activities
was mitigated by government data that showed a slim 0.1 percent
rise in construction spending in March.	
     	
    Trading volume was scant as financial markets in China and
many euro zone and Latin American countries were closed for May
Day or Labor Day.	
    As of 10 a.m. (1400 GMT), Treasuries volume was about half
its 20-day average, according to bond broker ICAP. 	
    There was a modest pickup in activity in advance of the
latest Treasuries purchase by the Fed for its "Operation Twist"
program. The U.S. central bank is set to buy $4.50 billion to
$5.25 billion in Treasuries due in May 2020 to Feb 2022 at 11
a.m. (1500 GMT).	
    The Fed's $400 billion bond program, aimed at holding down
mortgage rates and other long-term borrowing costs, is scheduled
to end in June. 	
    In the open market, benchmark 10-year notes 
traded down 7/32 in price to yield 1.95 percent, up 3 basis
points from Monday's close. 	
    Thirty-year bonds fell 17/32 in price for a 3.14
percent yield, up 3 basis points from late on Monday.	
    U.S. government debt prices started May on a down note after
a strong April.	
    Barclays' total return index on Treasuries rose 1.45 percent
in April, according to data that became available late on
Monday, lifting to the sector into positive territory for the
year after logging its worst quarter since 2010 from January to
March. Year-to-date, the index was up 0.14 percent.	
    The comeback in U.S. government debt was led by long-dated
issues, which regained their appeal due to anxiety about
Europe's fiscal problems and slowing growth in the United
States. Treasuries maturing in 20 years or later earned a total
of 4.66 percent last month, reducing their year-to-date decline
to 2.38 percent, according to Barclays.
FILED UNDER:
Comments (0)
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.