Japan nuclear power-free as last reactor shuts

TOKYO Sat May 5, 2012 6:02am EDT

A protester holds a sign at a march appealing to the Japanese government to put an end to nuclear power in Tokyo May, 5, 2012. Japan shuts down its last working nuclear power reactor this weekend just over a year after a tsunami scarred the nation and if it survives the summer without major electricity shortages, producers fear the plants will stay offline for good. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

A protester holds a sign at a march appealing to the Japanese government to put an end to nuclear power in Tokyo May, 5, 2012. Japan shuts down its last working nuclear power reactor this weekend just over a year after a tsunami scarred the nation and if it survives the summer without major electricity shortages, producers fear the plants will stay offline for good.

Credit: Reuters/Kim Kyung-Hoon

TOKYO (Reuters) - Japanese utility Hokkaido Electric Power Co began shutting the country's last active nuclear reactor on Saturday, leaving the world's third-biggest user of atomic energy with no nuclear-derived electricity for the first time since 1970.

A crisis at Tokyo Electric Power's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, where an earthquake and tsunami in March last year triggered radiation leaks, has hammered public faith in nuclear power and prevented the restart of reactors shut down for regular maintenance checks.

Hokkaido Electric said it started lowering output from the 912-megawatt No.3 unit at Tomari nuclear plant in northern Japan at 04:00 a.m. EDT (0800 GMT).

The maintenance on the unit is set to begin at around 10:00 a.m. EDT (1400 GMT) when power generation falls to zero, with the unit to be shut down completely by the early hours of Sunday.

The shutdown means all of Japan's 50 reactors have been taken off line, marking the country's first nuclear power-free day since May 1970.

Trade Minister Yukio Edano and three other ministers have been trying to win the support of communities to reactivate two idled reactors at Kansai Electric Power's Ohi nuclear plant to help ease expected power shortages of nearly 20 percent in coming hot-weather months.

The two Ohi reactors are the first to be considered for reactivation by the central government, but it faces an uphill battle of winning public support.

Kansai Electric's expected deficit for this summer was the highest among four Japanese nuclear plant operators that forecast shortfalls when demand peaks in the summer.

The last time Japan was nuclear power-free was for five days to May 4, 1970, when the two reactors then existing were shut for maintenance, according to the Federation of Electric Power Companies of Japan.

(Reporting by Osamu Tsukimori; Editing by Jeremy Laurence)

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Comments (3)
ElTejon wrote:
So, wait a minute: Are they permanently off-line, or just down for repairs?

May 05, 2012 1:44pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
rbrtwjohnson wrote:
It is time to change to aneutronic fusion to supply the world’s future needs with clean and safe energy. Other alternative energy, solar and wind, will require large areas to produce enough electric power, they’ll be far from being environmentally friendly when they become used in large scale. On the other hand, aneutronic fusion reactor can produce an awesome quantity of electricity using small areas, without producing any radioactive waste; it will reduce drastically the worldwide pollution. http://www.crossfirefusion.com/nuclear-fusion-reactor/overview.html

May 05, 2012 6:17pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
JoeAlpha100 wrote:
Well … seems the nuclear-power is neutralized there.

But the future of the world’s energy is still uncertain.

May 06, 2012 2:48am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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