Insecticide resistance threatens malaria fight

Tue May 15, 2012 8:00am EDT

Related Topics

* WHO says resistance reported in 64 countries with malaria

* Mosquito-borne disease kills more than 650,000 a year

* Action plan designed to stay ahead of insecticide threat

By Kate Kelland

LONDON, May 15 (Reuters) - Malaria-carrying mosquitoes in Africa and India are becoming resistant to insecticides, putting millions of lives at greater risk and threatening eradication efforts, health experts said on Tuesday.

While existing prevention measures such as mosquito nets treated with insecticide and indoor spraying are still effective, experts said tight surveillance and rapid response strategies were needed to prevent more resistance developing.

Despite decades of efforts to beat it with insecticides, bednets and combination drugs, malaria still kills more than 650,000 people a year, most of them babies and young children in sub-Saharan Africa.

Because the disease is spread by Anopheles mosquitoes, insecticides are a vital part of controlling it.

Publishing a plan to help countries tackle the threat, the World Health Organisation's global malaria programme said resistance had been detected in 64 countries.

"We think we're ahead of the curve. The tools we have today work extremely well in almost all settings, so we don't want people throwing their hands up in the air and saying this is a catastrophe," Robert Newman, the programme's director, told Reuters.

"But we have identified resistance, it is a problem out there, and we need to take urgent and concerted action to make sure we maintain the effectiveness of the tools."

The WHO recommends four main classes of insecticides, the most common of which are pyrethroids. But resistance to at least one of these classes has now been detected in all regions where the disease is endemic.

RESISTANCE SPREADS

A study published last year found that mosquitoes in one region of Senegal swiftly developed resistance to bednets treated with deltamethrin, a pyrethroid.

WHO director general Margaret Chan said the levels of resistance found in Africa and India were of greatest concern.

"These countries are characterised by high levels of malaria transmission and widespread reports of resistance," she said in a statement. In some places there was resistance to all four classes of insecticide.

The WHO plan says each country at risk must analyse the extent of resistance and design a pre-emptive management strategy as part of its national malaria control effort, rather than waiting for resistance to increase.

Experts estimate the cost of the global plan at more than $200 million a year, including research into insecticide resistance, research and development of new insecticides, and putting in place management strategies.

"We need to think of this as a long-term investment and look at what the costs would be if we did nothing," said Newman.

WHO estimates that malaria costs the African economy alone $12 billion every year, a multiple of the annual $1.5 billion spent globally on the fight against malaria.

"If, for example, we were to lose pyrethroids and not be able to use them any more, then malaria control could become very expensive very quickly," Newman said.

"But if we buy ourselves many more years of being able to use them - by responding quickly when we find resistance and proactively putting in strategies to stop the emergence of resistance - then the overall price tag for malaria control ... is likely to be lower." (Reporting by Kate Kelland; Editing by Kevin Liffey)

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Comments (1)
umojaresearch wrote:
Insecticide resistance threatens malaria fight

The World health Organization (WHO) and world governments are not fighting to stop malaria, or reduce the threat of mosquito infestations; they are fighting to sell chemicals and other false solutions to health problems in the world.

In 1925 Dr. Charles A. R. Campbell, gave the U.S. and World the solution to problems of mosquitos and how to reduce the infestations naturally and remedy the problems of malaria. His work was not accepted and when he realized why, he wrote a book to expose the reasons governments and doctors are not interested in remedies to the problems of mosquitos and malaria. Ultimately the reasons are the same for AIDS, Cancer and other health problems we are led to believe there is no cure or remedy and those reasons are too much money to be made selling drugs, chemicals and test equipment.

In 2007 Jim V. Humble wrote a paper on “A Miracle Treatment for Malaria and Other Diseases”. Although Mr. Humble had tested and proven his discovery of a substance he called Miracle Mineral Solution, or Master Mineral Solution (MMS), even after proof it worked in the U.S, South America and Africa, the information was suppressed because MMS cured more than just malaria.

We are constantly led to believe the WHO and these other health organizations are working in our best interest, but the fact of the matter is they work in the best interest of the Medical Industry, which profits from ill health. The numbers of suppressed cures and remedies to diseases, including AIDS/HIV and Cancer is incredible and the number of doctors, scientists and private citizens who are victimized for discovering and providing real cures and remedies is even more devastating.

Millions of lives are at risk because machines and chemicals are the only solution Global Governments and the WHO are willing to use to overcome a problem that was resolved as early as 1925, by Dr. Charles A. R. Campbell, who’s book “Bats, Mosquitoes and Dollars”, defines why disease which can be controlled is not controlled.

John
Ref:
1. Bats, Mosquitoes and Dollars, Dr. Charles A. R. Campbell
2. A Miracle Treatment for Malaria and Other Diseases, Jim V. Humble
3. Master Mineral Solution of The 3rd Millennium, James V. Humble
4. Flood Your Body With Oxygen, Ed McCabe
5. Politics In Healing: The Suppression and Manipulation of American Medicine, Daniel Haley
6. The Cure For All Diseases, Dr. Hulda Clark

May 18, 2012 8:01pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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