China steps up Afghan role as Western pullout nears

KABUL Sun Jun 3, 2012 12:57pm EDT

KABUL (Reuters) - China and Afghanistan will announce a plan in the coming days to deepen their ties, Afghan officials say, the strongest signal yet that Beijing wants a role beyond economic partnership as Western forces prepare to leave the country.

China has kept a low political profile through much of the decade-long international effort to stabilize Afghanistan, choosing instead to pursue an economic agenda, including locking in future supply from Afghanistan's untapped mineral resources.

As the U.S.-led coalition winds up military engagement and hands over security to local forces, Beijing, along with regional powers, is gradually stepping up involvement in an area that remains at risk from being overrun by Islamist insurgents.

Chinese President Hu Jintao and his Afghan counterpart Hamid Karzai will hold talks on the sidelines of the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation summit in Beijing this week, where they will lay out a plan governing future ties, including security cooperation.

Afghanistan has signed a series of strategic partnership agreements including with the United States, India and Britain among others in recent months, described by one Afghan official as taking out "insurance cover" for the period after the end of 2014 when foreign troops leave.

"The president of Afghanistan will be meeting the president of China in Beijing and what will happen is the elevation of our existing, solid relationship to a new level, to a strategic level," Janan Mosazai, a spokesman for the Afghan foreign ministry, told Reuters.

Details of an agreement will be fleshed out later, he said.

"It would certainly cover a broad spectrum which includes cooperation in the security sector, a very significant involvement in the economic sector, and the cultural field.

He declined to give details about security cooperation, but Andrew Small, an expert on China at the European Marshall Fund who has tracked its ties with South Asia, said the training of security forces was one possibility.

China has signaled it will not contribute to a multilateral fund to sustain the Afghan national security forces - estimated to cost $4.1 billion per year after 2014 - but it could directly train Afghan soldiers, Small said.

"They're concerned that there is going to be a security vacuum and they're concerned about how the neighbors will behave," he said.

Beijing has been running a small program with Afghan law enforcement officials, focused on counter-narcotics and involving visits to China's restive Xinjiang province, whose western tip touches the Afghan border.

Training of Afghan forces is expected to be modest, and nowhere near the scale of the Western effort to bring them up to speed, or even India's role in which small groups of officers are trained at military institutions in India.

China wants to play a more active role, but it will weigh the sensitivities of neighboring nations in a troubled corner of the world, said Zhang Li, a professor of South Asian studies at Sichuan University who has been studying the future of Sino-Afghan ties.

"I don't think that the U.S. withdrawal also means a Chinese withdrawal, but especially in security affairs in Afghanistan, China will remain low-key and cautious," he said. "China wants to play more of a role there, but each option in doing that will be assessed carefully before any steps are taken."

JOSTLING FOR INFLUENCE

Afghanistan's immediate neighbors Iran and Pakistan, but also nearby India and Russia, have all jostled for influence in the country at the crossroads of Central and South Asia, and many expect the competition to heat up after 2014.

India has poured aid into Afghanistan and like China has invested in its mineral sector, committing billions of dollars to develop iron ore deposits, as well as build a steel plant and other infrastructure.

It worries about a Taliban resurgence and the threat to its own security from Pakistan-based militants operating from the region.

Pakistan, which is accused of having close ties with the Taliban, has repeatedly complained about India's expanding role in Afghanistan, seeing Indian moves as a plot to encircle it.

"India-Pakistan proxy fighting is one of the main worries," said Small.

In February, China hosted a trilateral dialogue involving officials from Pakistan and Afghanistan to discuss efforts to seek reconciliation with the Taliban.

It was first time Beijing involved itself directly and openly in efforts to stabilize Afghanistan.

Afghan foreign ministry spokesman Mosazai said Kabul supported any effort to bring peace in the country. "China has close ties and friendship with Afghanistan. It also has very close ties with Pakistan and if it can help advance the vision of peace and stability in Afghanistan we welcome it."

(Additional reporting by Chris Buckley in BEIJING; Editing by Daniel Magnowski)

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Comments (7)
TomCutter wrote:
China has a great deal in this one. The US sends it’s children to fight and die paid for by the US taxpayers who are borrowing money from China to fit the bill. And then China doesn’t pick up any of the tab for the rebuilding efforts but receives full access to all of the oil (and poppy) in Afghanistan. Doesn’t anyone in the US feel like China is playing with them? The facts are clear, but the US is so busy arresting it’s own citizens and watching reality TV to even realize it’s being duped…For Shame.

Jun 03, 2012 1:30pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
OLDNORSEBRUIN wrote:
Afghanistan = Pakistan = HOPELESS.

Jun 03, 2012 3:07pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
PseudoTurtle wrote:
Frankly, the US should be grateful to China for assuming the leadership role in Afghanistan.

I have no doubt they will succeed where others have failed — Russia failed primarily due to US interference, which we are still paying the price for today — because the Chinese are a very pragmatic people.

The US, on the other hand, is very dogmatic, which is the main reason we failed, not only in Afghanistan, but Iraq, etc., going all the way back to Vietnam.

Our foreign policy is “fatally flawed” for that reason.

The real tragedy of these hopeless wars is that we have learned NOTHING since Vietnam.

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As a side note, this failed policy of “dogmatic intervention” arguably began after WWII with Japan, which seemed to succeed for a number of decades. However, that policy is now clearly failing in Japan as well, especially as US geopolitical power continues to erode around the world.

Jun 03, 2012 6:34pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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