Jeb Bush clarifies criticism of Republican Party

WASHINGTON Tue Jun 12, 2012 4:27pm EDT

Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, president of Jeb Bush and Associates, testifies before a House Budget Committee hearing on ''Removing the Barriers to Free Enterprise and Economic Growth'' on Capitol Hill in Washington June 1, 2012. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, president of Jeb Bush and Associates, testifies before a House Budget Committee hearing on ''Removing the Barriers to Free Enterprise and Economic Growth'' on Capitol Hill in Washington June 1, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Kevin Lamarque

Related Topics

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - After providing ammunition to President Barack Obama's re-election campaign by criticizing his fellow Republicans, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush clarified his comments on Tuesday and blamed Democrats for failing to compromise during Obama's term.

"The point I was making yesterday is this: The political system is hyperpartisan. Both sides are at fault," Bush wrote on his Twitter page.

Bush, brother to one Republican president and son of another, took issue with his own party on Monday, saying Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush might have not have been praised by Republicans today.

Reagan "would be criticized for doing things that he did," Bush told journalists at Bloomberg News in New York.

On Tuesday, Bush blamed Democrats for political gridlock.

"Past 4 years, Democrats have held leadership roles w/opportunities to each across the political aisle," Bush tweeted. "For sake of politics, they haven't."

"My dad & Reagan sacrificed political points for good public policy," he added.

Supporters of Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney have been eager to pounce on members of the opposing political party who appear to speak against their candidate's messages.

(Editing by Christopher Wilson)

FILED UNDER:
We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/
Comments (8)
drozd wrote:
People get the government they deserve.

Jun 12, 2012 4:31pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
USAPragmatist wrote:
Sounds awfully similar to that whole episode about the Camden, NJ mayor ‘criticizing’ Democrats a few weeks back. If we would just stop taking people’s comments out of context (a technique pioneered by FOX News and right-wing talk radio btw) like they did with this, and Obama saying ‘the private sector is doing fine’, and actually take the effort to listen, our political system would be much better.

And to clarify myself, yes the left does do this, but not NEARLY to the extreme of the right, IMO. So anyone declaring ‘they all do it’ is using a false equivalency. Kind of like the Super PAC thing, the left is using them because they need to compete with the right that pioneered these type of tactics. It would be stupid to try and fight them on an un-level playing field.

Jun 12, 2012 4:53pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Theodoric wrote:
The worst part about the current political climate isn’t the polarization of the parties, it’s this idea that there’s something wrong with criticizing your party.

Instead of open debate on policy, we’ve got “messages”, where our elected prophets stand atop their soapboxes repeating the same old mantras, over and over, solidifying them into ideology instead of trying to determine what would actually be good policy. We’re turning into a theocracy, where two dominant religions compete for power and heretics are burnt at the stake, or forced to issue confessions and accept baptism.

Whatever happened to dialogue? And I don’t mean between the parties, because we’re a long way from that, but within parties? Shouldn’t there be debate between Republicans about whether taxes might be a part of balancing the budget? Shouldn’t Democrats consider whether or not abortion is really murder? Shouldn’t issues be discussed, debated, turned over and eventually accepted or rejected as part of the party line?

But no, we’ve got our traditions, handed down to us from our fathers who received them from on high, and thou shalt not question them.

Jun 12, 2012 5:47pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.