Chief monitor says UN Syria team was targeted: envoys

UNITED NATIONS Tue Jun 19, 2012 7:36pm EDT

UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The chief U.N. monitor for Syria told the Security Council on Tuesday that his military observers were repeatedly targeted by hostile crowds and gunfire at close range last week before his decision to suspend the mission's operations.

General Robert Mood of Norway told the 15-nation council behind closed doors that his 300-strong unarmed observer force was targeted with gunfire or by hostile crowds at least 10 times last week, U.N. diplomats present at the meeting told Reuters on condition of anonymity.

Mood said that "indirect fire" incidents in which gunfire struck within 300 to 400 meters (yards) of observers occurred on a daily basis, envoys said. Last week, nine vehicles of the observer mission, known as UNSMIS, were struck or damaged, they added.

One diplomat said Mood spoke of "several hundred indirect fire incidents."

U.N. peacekeeping chief Herve Ladsous said last week that after 15 months of fighting between government forces and what began as a peaceful opposition demanding reforms and the ouster of President Bashar al-Assad, Syria was now in the throes of a full-scale civil war.

Days after Ladsous made that announcement in an interview with Reuters and AFP, Mood declared that UNSMIS had suspended operations. It was the clearest sign yet that a peace plan brokered by international mediator Kofi Annan has collapsed.

After the council meeting, Mood was asked by reporters why he suspended the mission's operations. "I made that decision based on the risks on the ground and based on the fact that the risks made it difficult to implement mandated tasks," he said.

He said UNSMIS would only resume full operations if there were a significant reduction in the level of violence and both the opposition and government voiced their commitment to the observers' safety and freedom of movement.

"The government has expressed that very clearly in the last couple of days," he said. "I have not seen the same clear statement from the opposition yet."

THE ONLY GAME IN TOWN

Syrian Ambassador Bashar Ja'afari blamed the escalation of violence on "armed groups" and "terrorists" and reiterated Damascus' commitment to Annan's peace plan. He also rejected Ladsous' remarks that Syria was now in an all-out civil war.

"The only way to push forward is to guarantee the success of the six-point plan of Mr. Kofi Annan," he said.

Ladsous also addressed the council and emphasized that the situation on the ground was too dangerous to allow the monitors to conduct normal patrols.

"Mood and Ladsous basically said that violence is escalating and that conditions are not met at present to allow the mission to run normally (and) safely enough," a diplomat said.

Ladsous told reporters that UNSMIS had suspended "most activities of the mission" due to what he described as "extremely serious security concerns."

Some Western diplomats have suggested that there was little point in having UNSMIS remain in Syria when Assad's government has not only ignored former U.N. chief Annan's peace plan but has stepped up its military assaults to seize rebel-held territory.

The rebels have said they no longer felt bound by an April 12 truce that Annan brokered but which never took hold. The opposition has also stepped up its military operations, contributing to an overall escalation in the violence.

Ladsous said UNSMIS' 90-day mandate expires on July 20. He declined to say whether he expected the council to extend it.

"We shall see in due course before July 20 what the Security Council's decision is on that," he said.

He added that the United Nations remained committed to Annan's peace plan, which he said was the only peace proposal under consideration at the moment.

"There's no other game in town," Ladsous said. "There's no plan B."

(Additional reporting by Michelle Nichols; Editing by Christopher Wilson and Peter Cooney)

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Comments (1)
Fromkin wrote:
This is what General Mood says:

“The government has expressed that very clearly in the last couple of days,” he said. “I have not seen the same clear statement from the opposition yet.”

Contrast his statement with what Reuters attributes to “some Western diplomats”:

Some Western diplomats have suggested that there was little point in having UNSMIS remain in Syria when Assad’s government has not only ignored former U.N. chief Annan’s peace plan but has stepped up its military assaults to seize rebel-held territory.

Draw your own conclusion.

Western supported armed gangs kill at least 20 security forces daily. Most of the security forces killed are new conscripts lightly armed, working at checkpoints away from city centers.

The massacre of Houla by armed gangs started when security checkpoints were overrun killing all miliray personnel.

Rebels have never committed to Annan plan. They saw it as an opportunity to regroup and star launching attacks against security forces and those who don’t support them. On May 10 two suicide bombings killed 55 and wounded 400 civilians while UN monitors were in Syria.

In those terrorist attacks even Western officials and the UN blamed al-Qaida terrorists. But the truth is it was the same armed gangs, some of them affiliated with al-qaida.

Another lie is that there are “rebel held territories”.

There are none. It’s true that some parts of Syria experience lawlewssness due to the concentration of armed gangs in these areas notably border towns with Lebanon and Turkey. But there is simply not a Benghazi-like situation in Syria.

Jun 19, 2012 10:18pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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