Concerned about Arizona law after court ruling: Obama

WASHINGTON Mon Jun 25, 2012 12:48pm EDT

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Barack Obama said on Monday he was pleased the Supreme Court struck down key parts of Arizona's immigration law but was concerned about the standing provision allowing police to stop people they suspect are illegal immigrants.

"I remain concerned about the practical impact of the remaining provision of the Arizona law that requires local law enforcement officials to check the immigration status of anyone they even suspect to be here illegally," Obama said in a statement released by the White House.

"No American should ever live under a cloud of suspicion just because of what they look like. Going forward, we must ensure that Arizona law enforcement officials do not enforce this law in a manner that undermines the civil rights of Americans, as the Court's decision recognizes."

(Reporting by Jeff Mason; Editing by Sandra Maler)

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Comments (1)
stambo2001 wrote:
Let me explain profiling to you:

If a 6′ ‘black’ man were to rob a bank it WOULD be profiling to set up a roadblock and investigate 6′ tall black males.

If a 6′ ‘latino’ were to rob a bank it WOULD be profiling to set up a roadblock and investigate 6′ tall ‘latino’ males.

However, if a 6′ ‘white’ man were to rob a bank it would NOT be profiling to set up a roadblock and investigate 6′ tall ‘white’ males. Understand how it works now?

It don’t matter about statistics.

Jun 25, 2012 1:52pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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