U.S. files complaint against China auto duties: WTO

GENEVA Thu Jul 5, 2012 12:32pm EDT

Newly assembled 2013 Ford Escapes sit on plant lots ready to be shipped out to dealers at the newly transformed Louisville Assembly Plant in Louisville, Kentucky, June 13, 2012. REUTERS/John Sommers II

Newly assembled 2013 Ford Escapes sit on plant lots ready to be shipped out to dealers at the newly transformed Louisville Assembly Plant in Louisville, Kentucky, June 13, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/John Sommers II

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GENEVA (Reuters) - The United States has filed a trade complaint against China for imposing duties on U.S.-made autos, the World Trade Organization (WTO) said on Thursday.

"We have now received formal notification from the U.S.," WTO spokesman Keith Rockwell told Reuters.

Earlier in Washington, a senior U.S. official said the United States would file a complaint against China on Thursday with the Geneva-based trade watchdog for imposing duties on more than $3 billion worth of U.S.-made autos.

(Reporting by Stephanie Nebehay; Editing by Andrew Heavens)

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Comments (11)
tomwinans wrote:
Why do we continue in our naiveté?

China is far more interested in understanding how to be independent of the West than it is in being a good citizen of a global economy. This sounds harsh and/or cynical, but is it? When it can keep money at home … when it knows how to build or do and it needs to ensure its people have jobs … is it not in its best interest to establish policies for such? Can it participate in a global economy without ensuring its own health to the best of its abilities?

Does this not sound like something that the US also should do?

Jul 05, 2012 8:15am EDT  --  Report as abuse
tomwinans wrote:
Why do we continue in our naiveté?

China is far more interested in understanding how to be independent of the West than it is in being a good citizen of a global economy. This sounds harsh and/or cynical, but is it? When it can keep money at home … when it knows how to build or do and it needs to ensure its people have jobs … is it not in its best interest to establish policies for such? Can it participate in a global economy without ensuring its own health to the best of its abilities?

Does this not sound like something that the US also should do?

Jul 05, 2012 8:15am EDT  --  Report as abuse
tomwinans wrote:
Why do we continue in our naiveté?

China is far more interested in understanding how to be independent of the West than it is in being a good citizen of a global economy. This sounds harsh and/or cynical, but is it? When it can keep money at home … when it knows how to build or do and it needs to ensure its people have jobs … is it not in its best interest to establish policies for such? Can it participate in a global economy without ensuring its own health to the best of its abilities?

Does this not sound like something that the US also should do?

Jul 05, 2012 8:16am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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