Armstrong given more time to answer cycling doping charges

NEW YORK Wed Jul 11, 2012 5:23pm EDT

Lance Armstrong, founder of the LIVESTRONG foundation, takes part in a special session regarding cancer in the developing world during the Clinton Global Initiative in New York September 22, 2010. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Lance Armstrong, founder of the LIVESTRONG foundation, takes part in a special session regarding cancer in the developing world during the Clinton Global Initiative in New York September 22, 2010.

Credit: Reuters/Lucas Jackson

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NEW YORK (Reuters) - The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency on Wednesday gave seven-time Tour de France champion Lance Armstrong 30 more days to answer charges that he used performance-enhancing drugs during his cycling career.

"This extension will allow the court sufficient time to evaluate Mr. Armstrong's amended complaint," Tim Herman, a lawyer representing Armstrong, said in a statement.

Armstrong filed an 80-page lawsuit on Monday aimed at halting the agency's case against him, but it was dismissed later that day. The lawsuit was refiled with changes on Tuesday.

The anti-doping agency said it gave Armstrong the extension until the lawsuit or any preliminary injunction is ruled upon.

"USADA believes this lawsuit, like previous lawsuits aimed at concealing the truth, is without merit," USADA chief executive officer Travis Tygart said in a statement.

The charges against Armstrong, if found true, could lead to penalties that could invalidate his Tour de France victories and ban him from the sport for life.

The new deadline for Armstrong to answer the charges is August 13.

(Editing by Greg McCune. Desking by Christopher Wilson)

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Comments (2)
One would think the guy would be ready. After all he passed 500 drug tests, so you would think he would like to get this over sooner, rather than later. Uh! Maybe he’s guilty? How could that be? Everybody knows the answer to that one, except him.

Jul 11, 2012 5:49pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
mleveratt wrote:
How can someone who has had over 500 clean drug tests be prosecuted for doping? It boogles the mind. I do feel they have a vendetta against Lance Armstrong.

Jul 11, 2012 5:58pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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