North Korea says U.S. hostility forcing it to "reexamine" nuclear program

SEOUL Fri Jul 20, 2012 7:50am EDT

Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) leader Kim Jong-un (C) and President of the Presidium of the Supreme People's Assembly of DPRK Kim Yong-nam (R) watch a military parade to celebrate the centenary of the birth of DPRK's founder Kim Il-sung in Pyongyang April 15, 2012. REUTERS/Stringer

Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) leader Kim Jong-un (C) and President of the Presidium of the Supreme People's Assembly of DPRK Kim Yong-nam (R) watch a military parade to celebrate the centenary of the birth of DPRK's founder Kim Il-sung in Pyongyang April 15, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Stringer

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SEOUL (Reuters) - North Korea said on Friday it was being forced to "reexamine" its nuclear program because of fresh signs the United States remains hostile towards the country, indicating it will step up defiant efforts to boost its nuclear arsenal.

The new leadership of North Korea, headed by the third generation of the Kim family, reinforced its control on the reclusive state this week by further promoting its young leader Jong-un and purging a top general who was seen as opposing his reforms.

The North has denied in recent months that it was preparing to conduct a third nuclear test, after a failed rocket launch widely seen as a long-range missile test in disguise, which effectively scrapped a deal on moratorium on such tests reached with Washington in February.

"The consistent hostile policy towards the DPRK pursued by the U.S. is giving rise to the evil cycle of confrontation and tensions on the Korean Peninsula, making the prospect of denuclearizing the peninsula all the more gloomy," the North's unnamed Foreign Ministry spokesman said.

DPRK is short for the North's official name, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

"The situation compels the DPRK to totally reexamine the nuclear issue," the spokesman said in comments carried by the official KCNA news agency.

"Without the U.S. fundamental repeal of its hostile policy toward the DPRK first, it will be completely impossible to settle the issue of ensuring the lasting peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula."

North Korea this week accused the United States of masterminding a sabotage on the statues of its dead leaders in Pyongyang by sending a defector who had fled to the South back into the country to destroy them.

(Reporting by Jack Kim; Editing by Daniel Magnowski)

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Comments (10)
derdutchman wrote:
Does lil Kim really want to communicate to the world that some disgruntled vandal dictates North Korean policy? A mouse makes even the largest elephant trumpet.

Jul 20, 2012 9:54am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Krowster wrote:
So what’s your point? Nuclear weapons in that area are controlled by Russia and China. If HK wants to spend what little moneys they have on stock piling, let them. The only countries that will have to deal with the threat have already been mentioned.

Every time a baby cries, it’s either wet, hungrey or sleepy, and mommy then gives them what they desire. We’re not your mommy.

Jul 20, 2012 9:57am EDT  --  Report as abuse
ChangeWhat wrote:
You will reap what you sow lil kim.

@Krowster if NK figures out icbm technology we have a problem on the west coast.

Jul 20, 2012 12:14pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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