GM says has ousted global marketing chief

NEW YORK Sun Jul 29, 2012 7:30pm EDT

General Motors Co U.S. marketing chief Joel Ewanick accepts the 2011 Green Car of the Year Award for the Chevy Volt at the LA Auto show in Los Angeles November 18, 2010. REUTERS/Phil McCarten

General Motors Co U.S. marketing chief Joel Ewanick accepts the 2011 Green Car of the Year Award for the Chevy Volt at the LA Auto show in Los Angeles November 18, 2010.

Credit: Reuters/Phil McCarten

NEW YORK (Reuters) - General Motors Co (GM.N) ousted its global marketing chief Joel Ewanick a little more than two years after he joined the company, the largest U.S. automaker said on Sunday.

"He failed to meet the expectations that the company has for its employees," GM spokesman Greg Martin said. He declined to elaborate.

In a statement, GM said Ewanick's departure was effective immediately. He will be replaced on an interim basis by Alan Batey, the head of U.S. sales and service.

Ewanick, 52, who did not return phone calls on Sunday, was named vice president and head of GM's U.S. marketing in May 2010 and was promoted to global chief marketing officer in December 2010. He joined GM from Nissan North America, where he served briefly as vice president and chief marketing officer. Before that, Ewanick spent three years as vice president of marketing for Hyundai Motor America.

In an official company biography, GM said Ewanick "was responsible for improving the positioning of the Chevrolet, Buick, GMC and Cadillac brands and consumer consideration of GM vehicles in the United States."

Ewanick pulled GM's paid advertising from Facebook earlier this year and announced recently that the automaker would not be advertising during the Super Bowl in 2013. Both moves were regarded as controversial both within and outside of GM.

Under Ewanick, GM also consolidated its global advertising and marketing, in a move intended to save the company billions of dollars over the next five years.

(Reporting By Paul Lienert and Deepa Seetharaman in Detroit; Editing by Diane Craft)

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Comments (1)
rts1 wrote:
I guess he told them that nothing would bring them back to the prominence of the 1950′s and that Opal was a dead product. Or, maybe he got caught driving a Ford.

Jul 29, 2012 7:50pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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