Panetta: no Iran attack plans to be discussed with Israel

CAIRO Tue Jul 31, 2012 1:05pm EDT

Egypt's president Mohamed Mursi (R) meets with U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta and Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi (L) at the presidential palace in Cairo July 31, 2012. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh

Egypt's president Mohamed Mursi (R) meets with U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta and Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi (L) at the presidential palace in Cairo July 31, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Amr Abdallah Dalsh

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CAIRO (Reuters) - U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta denied media reports on Tuesday that he would discuss possible military attack plans against Iran during a brief visit to Israel.

Speaking at a press conference in Cairo shortly before departing for Israel, Panetta said he would be talking about "various contingencies", but said specific military plans would not be put forward.

"I think it's the wrong characterization to say we are going to be discussing potential attack plans. What we are discussing are various contingencies and how we would respond," he said.

Asked whether these included military options, he said: "We obviously continue to work on a number of options in that area, but the discussions that I hope to have with Israel are going to be more about what is the threat that we're confronting and to try to share both information and intelligence on that."

Western powers believe Iran is seeking the technology to build a nuclear bomb and Israel has repeatedly hinted it might use force to try to halt its arch foe's atomic program. Tehran says its nuclear work is for peaceful purposes.

The United States has said it is determined to prevent Iran from getting the bomb, but has called on Israel to give more time for increasingly severe economic sanctions to work.

"Both of our countries are committed to ensuring that Iran does not develop a nuclear weapon and to that extent we continue to work together in the effort to ensure that Iran does not reach that point of developing a nuclear weapon," Panetta said.

Top selling Israeli daily Yedioth Ahronoth said on Tuesday that Panetta intended to show Israeli leaders the plans being drawn up by the Pentagon to stop Iran if diplomacy and sanctions failed to persuade Tehran to halt its nuclear program.

The Israeli army chief, Benny Gantz, told reporters in Tel Aviv on Tuesday that the Israeli Defence Forces (IDF) were ready to attack Iran if necessary.

"The IDF is ready and prepared for action and as we see it 'all options are on the table' is not a slogan, it is a working plan and we are doing it," he said, referring to a line often repeated by Israeli politicians when discussing Iran.

Panetta is due to meet his Israeli counterpart, Ehud Barak, and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during his stay in Israel, part of a broader trip to the Middle East and Africa.

A senior Israeli official on Sunday denied a separate newspaper report that President Barack Obama's national security adviser had briefed Netanyahu on a U.S. contingency plan to attack Iran should diplomacy fail to curb its nuclear ambitions.

(Additional reporting by Maayan Lubell in Jerusalem; Writing by Crispian Balmer; Editing by Alessandra Rizzo)

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Comments (2)
Harry079 wrote:
So how many Carrier Groups are in the Persian Gulf area?

Four? Five?

Jul 31, 2012 1:18pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Blackorpheus wrote:
Defense Secretary Panetta denies discussing a potential US-Israel joint assault on Iran. What they will discuss are “various contingencies.” That clarifies matters.

Jul 31, 2012 1:37pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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