Moses says only error or injury can stop Bolt

LONDON Thu Aug 9, 2012 8:01am EDT

Jamaica's Usain Bolt (L) runs to take first place next to South Africa's Anaso Jobodwana in their men's 200m semi-final during the London 2012 Olympic Games at the Olympic Stadium August 8, 2012. REUTERS/Eddie Keogh

Jamaica's Usain Bolt (L) runs to take first place next to South Africa's Anaso Jobodwana in their men's 200m semi-final during the London 2012 Olympic Games at the Olympic Stadium August 8, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Eddie Keogh

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LONDON (Reuters) - Only a major error or injury will deny Usain Bolt victory in the men's 200 meters final at the London Olympics on Thursday, according to twice 400 meters hurdles champion Ed Moses.

"It comes down to the biomechanics of his running stride, which is longer because of his height," Moses said in an article published in the Daily Telegraph on Thursday.

"If he gets up to speed, there is no stopping him because he can take advantage of the incredible leverage his legs give him."

Moses, who broke the world record four times and was unbeaten for almost 10 years, said Bolt also enjoyed the benefit of hard modern tracks such as the one at the London Olympic stadium.

"I would have loved to be able to run on a hard surface like this," he said. "We would run on far softer surfaces."

Moses said he regarded Bolt, who retained the 100 meters title on Sunday, as the greatest sprinter ever but said Carl Lewis had endured a much tougher schedule when he won the 100-200 double in 1984 followed by a gold and silver four years later.

"Lewis had to run four races in two days for each event - two heats on the first day and then the semi-final and final on the second," Moses wrote.

"For the 200 meters, Bolt is running three races over three days. Would he able to manage Lewis's schedule and survive? There is no way of telling."

(Writing by John Mehaffey; Editing by Clare Fallon)

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