Tanzania confirms it re-flagged 36 Iran ships, to deregister them

DAR ES SALAAM Sat Aug 11, 2012 8:57pm EDT

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DAR ES SALAAM (Reuters) - Tanzania said a shipping agent based in Dubai had reflagged 36 Iranian oil tankers with the Tanzanian flag without the country's knowledge and approval.

Tanzania said it was now in the process of de-registering the vessels after an investigation into the origin of the ships concluded they were originally from Iran.

Tanzania launched an investigation last month over accusations that it had reflagged oil tankers from Iran and asked the United States and European Union to help it verify the origin of the tankers flying the east African country's flag.

A report with the investigation's findings was discussed in the House of Representatives of Zanzibar, a semi-autonomous part of Tanzania late on Friday, and the minutes of that debate were seen by Reuters late on Saturday.

Reflagging ships masks their ownership, which could make it easier for Iran to obtain insurance and financing for the cargoes, as well as find buyers for the shipments without attracting attention from the United States and European Union.

The National Iranian Tanker Company (NITC) changed the names and flags of many of its oil tankers ahead of the EU ban, part of sweeping economic measures aimed at pressuring Tehran to end its nuclear program.

The ships flying Tanzania's flag were re-flagged by Zanzibar, which has claimed it was misled by its Dubai-based agent, Philtex, and would end its contract with that firm.

"The government has thoroughly investigated this issue and established that the Zanzibar Maritime Authority (ZMA) through our Dubai-based agent, Philtex, registered 36 Iranian crude oil tankers and containership vessels to fly the Tanzanian flag," Zanzibar Vice President Seif Ali Iddi told the assembly.

"The Zanzibar government is in the process of de-registering the ships and also terminating its agency contract with Philtex after establishing the truth that these (Iranian) ships are flying the Tanzanian flag."

Howard Berman, the ranking member of the U.S. House Committee on Foreign Affairs, had accused Tanzania of reflagging at least six and possibly as many at 10 tankers, saying it was helping Iran evade U.S. and European Union sanctions aimed at pressuring Tehran to curb its nuclear program.

He said Tanzania could face U.S. sanctions for the practice.

Berman has also asked the small South Pacific island nation Tuvalu to stop reflagging Iranian oil tankers and warned its government of the risks of running afoul of U.S. sanctions.

(Writing by James Macharia; editing by Todd Eastham)

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Comments (1)
FatherJames wrote:
…Rhodesia was placed under U.N. sanctions in 1965 and did not surrender power until 1980… due to circumstances having nothing to do with sanctions. The country was landlocked with no oil… with a tiny educated population… and almost no friends. But everybody got in line to sell to them under the table.

…Iran has oil, a massive seacoast, and friends like Russia,China and North Korea… over the table… and lots of customers under the table… Until they make the adjustments, sactions will be a bother to them… but once they adapt, they will do just fine thank you… and nuclear weapon project should continue on schedule…

…Any politico tells you that sanctions will work is either a deluded idiot or simply lying until the next election… Most politicians know that sanctions almost always make a “political statement” but seldom have any real effect… certainly not on evil dictators or rabid fanatics…

Aug 11, 2012 9:30pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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