Arsenal found in Mexico after boy, 9, takes gun to school

MEXICO CITY Fri Sep 7, 2012 6:00pm EDT

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MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - A family of suspected drug traffickers in Mexico lost an arsenal after their 9-year-old boy took a gun to school, leading police to a house full of lethal weapons.

Classmates of the youngster spotted a loaded pistol in his school bag and alerted authorities, a spokesman for police in the northern city of Hermosillo said on Friday.

Police raided the boy's home after confiscating the weapon, which was loaded with bullets known as "cop killers" designed to penetrate bullet-proof vests, he added.

At the house, police found 13,000 rounds of ammunition, various pistols and rifles, including AK-47s, as well as an Uzi submachine gun. There were also military uniforms, dozens of portable radios and two money counting machines.

An armed man at the house saw the police coming and managed to escape. A woman inside was arrested. The boy was taken into the care of social workers, the spokesman said.

(Reporting by Dave Graham; editing by Christopher Wilson)

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Comments (1)
rob1990 wrote:
Guns don’t kill people. Bullets in their casings don’t kill people. Rounds in the chamber of the gun don’t kill people.

Tell me, what part of this is dangerous? A round can sit in the chamber of a gun indefinitely and won’t go off if given the appropriate respects. If the safety is on and is operational, the gun will never go off by itself assuming the primer and casing are corroding.

Next time whoever wrote this writes an article, stop tying to spin it so much. You only cast doubts over your credibility as a journalist/reporter, and affect the credibility of Reuters in general.

We want the facts and the news, not the personal opinions of a writer. If you want your opinions, post in the comment section like I have or start a blog. Simple, no?

Sep 08, 2012 1:42am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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