Former U.S. lawmaker Giffords wows convention crowd

Thu Sep 6, 2012 9:08pm EDT

* Former congresswoman walks with limp but no cane

* Leads pledge to U.S. flag in clear voice

By Patricia Zengerle

CHARLOTTE, N.C., Sept 6 (Reuters) - Former Arizona congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, still recovering from being shot in the head, made a moving appearance at the Democratic National Convention on Thursday night to lead the pledge of allegiance.

The hall erupted into a standing ovation as Giffords walked across the stage - limping, but without a cane - accompanied by U.S. Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz, the president of the Democratic Party and a close friend.

Giffords' voice was clear as she led the crowd in the short pledge, but her somewhat hesitant speech showed she is still affected by her injuries.

The crowd chanted "Gaby, Gaby," as she left the podium, smiling and waving. She stopped to blow a kiss and then went backstage.

Giffords was shot on Jan. 8, 2011, during a "meet-and-greet" event at a supermarket in Tucson. Six people were killed, including a 9-year-old girl and a federal judge, and 12 others were wounded.

One of the most touching moments of the convention was a reminder that gun control has received little attention at the gathering in Charlotte, North Carolina, where the Democrats nominated President Barack Obama to run for re-election.

Obama has been careful not to take a controversial stand on the issue, especially during an election year. The gun lobby is powerful and gun ownership is a sensitive topic for many voters in states like Virginia and Ohio, where Obama faces a tougher fight if he hopes to defeat Republican Mitt Romney on Nov. 6.

Giffords resigned her seat in the U.S. Congress in January 2012 to focus on her recovery.

Jared Loughner, 23, pleaded guilty last month to six murders and other charges stemming from the shootings in a deal that will spare him the death penalty.

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