Occupy Wall Street plans to surround NYSE to mark anniversary

Sat Sep 15, 2012 7:06am EDT

An Occupy Wall Street activist takes part in a march in downtown Manhattan in New York July 11, 2012. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

An Occupy Wall Street activist takes part in a march in downtown Manhattan in New York July 11, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Eduardo Munoz

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(Reuters) - Occupy Wall Street marks its first anniversary on Monday, and, in a bid to rejuvenate a movement that has failed to sustain momentum after sparking a national conversation about economic inequality last fall, activists plan once again to descend on New York's financial district.

The group, which popularized the phrase "We are the 99 percent," will attempt to surround the New York Stock Exchange and disrupt morning rush hour in the financial district, according to a movement spokeswoman.

Monday's protests will cap a weekend of Occupy Wall Street seminars, music and demonstrations in New York, said Linnea Paton, 24, an OWS spokeswoman. Demonstrations are also planned in other U.S. cities, other OWS organizers said.

The grassroots movement caught the world by surprise last fall with a spontaneous encampment in lower Manhattan that soon spread to cities across North America and Europe.

Occupy Wall Street briefly revived a long-dormant spirit of U.S. social activism, and drew enduring attention to economic injustice.

CONCERT, "SIT-INS" PLANNED

But the movement's colorful cast of theatrical demonstrators struggled through last winter to sustain the momentum that first drew attention to its patchwork of economic grievances - including corporate malfeasance on Wall Street, crippling student debt and aggressive bank foreclosures on American homes.

On Sunday, organizers will provide live music, including a Foley Square concert featuring Tom Morello, guitarist for the rock band Rage Against the Machine.

At 7 a.m. Monday, some protesters will try to surround the NYSE, while others will engage in a loosely choreographed series of "sit-ins" at intersections throughout the financial district, according to OWS's website.

The tactics are designed to undermine New York police efforts to contain protesters on the narrow, winding streets of the financial district.

Last year's demonstrations featured the spectacle of activists breaking into sudden dashes down one narrow street or another, pursued by visibly frustrated police and television reporters tripping down cobblestone streets.

Sound permits for Sunday's events have been secured, Paton said, but OWS has not sought permits for Monday's protests - which last fall led to mass arrests and clashes between police and protesters. Occupy Wall Street maintains about $50,000 in its bail fund, several organizers said.

NYPD READY FOR CONFRONTATIONS

Chief New York Police Department spokesman Paul Brown confirmed that no OWS demonstration permit applications were submitted, but said police will be prepared for demonstrations.

"We accommodate peaceful protests and make arrests for unlawful activity," he said.

Brown said that based on previous experience with OWS, the NYPD expects that "a relatively small group of self-described anarchists will attempt unlawful activity and try to instigate confrontations with police by others while attempting to escape arrest themselves ... we expect most demonstrators to be peaceful."

New York police have made a total of 1,852 Occupy arrests as of September 12, 2012, according to Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance's office, including the arrest of 700 protesters who spilled into the roadway while marching across the Brooklyn Bridge last October.

On Friday, Twitter was ordered by a New York judge to turn over the tweets of one of the protesters arrested on the bridge. That case has emerged as a closely watched court fight over law enforcement access to users' social media content.

Six weeks after the Brooklyn Bridge arrests, citing public health concerns, New York authorities entered the Manhattan OWS camp and disbursed protesters. The movement has never regained its initial momentum.

(Additional reporting by Joseph Ax; Editing by Dan Burns)

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Comments (6)
dualcitizen wrote:
National conversation? I don’t think so, more like sparked a national joke.

Sep 15, 2012 9:33am EDT  --  Report as abuse
sidevalve56 wrote:
you know i still quite haven’t figured out what this movement expects…in fact i don’t think they do either…they have no strategy or goals…unless you count making wildly unrealistic demands and then causing disruption when they aren’t met. I would say with confidence that anyone who is ever made to do something they dont think is right will most likely resist or fight back. Take for example the actual occupy movement. They feel wronged that other people are controlling aspects of their or others’ lives, and that there is a lack of fairness. This being said, i’m sure the people that the occupy movement is against feel the same way. So i dont see the wall street people doing too much to try to give these people what they want. They will resist or push back just as much. In short the whole situation is probably a waste of both sides’ time. Just my opinion.

Sep 15, 2012 9:37am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Sabertooth wrote:
More like the 1% of total losers.

Sep 15, 2012 10:22am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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