French leaders sound alarm over planned Mohammad cartoons

PARIS Tue Sep 18, 2012 5:54pm EDT

France's Prime Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault delivers a speech at the end of a two-day environmental conference in Paris September 15, 2012. REUTERS/Kenzo Tribouillard/Pool

France's Prime Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault delivers a speech at the end of a two-day environmental conference in Paris September 15, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Kenzo Tribouillard/Pool

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PARIS (Reuters) - The French government has called for restraint after learning that a satirical weekly plans to publish cartoons of the Prophet Mohammad on Wednesday just as an anti-Islam video has ignited Muslim protests around the globe.

The Paris offices of the paper, Charlie Hebdo, were firebombed last November after it published a mocking caricature of Mohammad, and in 2005 Danish cartoons of the Prophet sparked a wave of protests across the Muslim world in which at least 50 people were killed.

Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, asked about the publication, said any provocation now could only be condemned.

Prime Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault issued a statement saying: "In the current climate, the prime minister wishes to stress his disapproval of all excess and calls on everyone to behave responsibly."

France is home to Europe's largest Muslim population. Calls are already circulating on social networks and the Internet for protests on Saturday over an anti-Islam film that was made with private funds in the United States and posted on the Internet.

Last Sunday police arrested about 150 people who sought to take part in an unapproved protest near the U.S. Embassy in Paris.

In the torrent of violence blamed on the film, U.S. and other Western embassies have been attacked in cities in Asia, Africa and the Middle East.

The U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other Americans were killed last week in an attack in Benghazi, and Afghan militants killed 12 people in a suicide attack on Tuesday that they said was in retaliation for the film.

CHARLIE HEBDO REFUSES TO BOW

Charlie Hebdo, renowned for its irreverent treatment of the political establishment and public figures, argued that it had the right to uphold that tradition.

"We do caricatures of everyone, and above all every week, and when we do it with the Prophet, it's called provocation," the paper's editor, Stephane Charbonnier, told the news channel i>TELE.

He said that if Charlie Hebdo stopped printing satirical work because of pressure or fear of offence, it would be reduced to selling 16 blank pages every week.

Cartoons seen by Reuters that were due to be published on the inside pages of the paper included a series of images, including nude caricatures, poking fun at Mohammad.

Many Muslims object to any representation of Allah or Mohammad or to irreverent treatment of the Koran.

The main body representing Muslims in France, the French Muslim Council (CFCM), accused Charlie Hebdo of firing up anti-Muslim sentiment at a sensitive time.

"The CFCM is deeply attached to freedom of speech but considers that nothing can justify insult and inciting hatred," it said in a statement.

"The CFCM calls on the Muslims of France not to give in to such provocation and urges them to express their indignation calmly and in lawful manner."

Charlie Hebdo has got into hot water on similar issues more than once.

Former editor Philippe Val was pursued in French courts on charges of racial injury, and ultimately acquitted, after the paper reprinted the Danish cartoons of Mohammad.

(Additional reporting by Gerard Bon; Editing by Kevin Liffey)

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Comments (7)
walfourth wrote:
Why should I respect someone who runs out and commits mayhem at the drop of a hat?

Sep 18, 2012 6:23pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
boreal wrote:
What would happen if someone would dare to produce a series of cartoons lampooning the holocaust, ridiculing the Jewish faith irritating to the Jews worldwide and publish it referring to his human rights, freedom of the press, freedom of artistic expression, and halve a dozen other seldom used rights?

Sep 18, 2012 7:45pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Bring it on now. The world against the closed minded oppressive mind controlling intolerance and ignorance of the Muslim Islamic fanatics. If the Islamic believers can’t live with those in the world who don’t follow their faith and think they need to murder all no-believers then it is time to get down and dirty and end this once and for all. May the best men win. Reason and itellectual discussion and tolerance of tose who wish to be different are unexceptable to followers of Islam. I personally am tired of turning the other cheek while these barbarians run wild in the street destroying anything that does not agree with them. They only understand force so let’s show them force.

Sep 18, 2012 7:58pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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