Romney's Libya comments landed with a thud: Reuters/Ipsos poll

WASHINGTON Tue Sep 18, 2012 5:31pm EDT

U.S. Republican presidential nominee and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney takes his grandson Wyatt (C) and granddaughter Gracie on a tour of his campaign plane in Salt Lake City, Utah September 18, 2012. REUTERS/Jim Young

U.S. Republican presidential nominee and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney takes his grandson Wyatt (C) and granddaughter Gracie on a tour of his campaign plane in Salt Lake City, Utah September 18, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Jim Young

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney was the loser in a political fight over U.S. reaction to attacks last week on American diplomatic compounds in Libya and Egypt, according to a Reuters/Ipsos poll on Tuesday.

Four in 10 U.S. voters felt less favorably toward Romney after hearing about his criticism of President Barack Obama's handling of the attacks in which the U.S. ambassador to Libya was killed.

Only 26 percent of the registered voters polled felt worse about Obama after hearing about the Democrat's comments about the violence in the Middle East, the survey said.

"Romney probably did not do anything to shore up his foreign policy cred on this particular issue," Ipsos pollster Julia Clark said, but she noted that foreign policy was typically low on lists of the issues most important to American voters.

Romney took heavy criticism for issuing a statement accusing Obama of sympathizing with Islamists who waged the attacks on U.S. diplomatic compounds in Egypt and Libya.

For his part, Obama vowed to work with the Libyan government to bring to justice the killers of the ambassador and three other Americans.

The poll found that 37 percent of voters felt more favorable toward Obama after hearing about his remarks, versus 29 percent who felt favorable about Romney after hearing about his statement.

The flap last week started a tough period for Romney, who struggled to stabilize his reeling campaign after a secretly recorded video showed him belittling Obama's supporters, raising questions about his ability to come from behind and win the November 6 election.

The poll surveyed 792 registered voters.

The precision of the Reuters/Ipsos online polls is measured using a credibility interval. In this case, the poll has a credibility interval of plus or minus 4.0 percentage points for all respondents.

(Editing by Alistair Bell and Eric Beech)

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Comments (14)
totherepublic wrote:
4 in 10 against sounds like 60% fin favor to me. We will take that margin in November, no problem. Now that we know what Obama had to say was a lie……and Romney disagreed with his lie.

Sep 18, 2012 5:44pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
totherepublic wrote:
wyldbill
Ill advised? So you must disagree with Kisinger for agreeing with Romney? Wow that makes you a pretty smart person. We all should bow in your presence. Like Obama did to the king of saudi arabia? Not a chance.

Sep 18, 2012 6:08pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
dmanning wrote:
To totherepublic,

4 in 10 viewing less favorably sounds like 60% in favor to you? What are you, learning disabled? What it means is the majority of the remaining six said it didn’t change their view of him. By your handicapped math, the same stat in the article relating to the President would mean that over 70% are now in favor of him. Loser: your boy Romney.

And in your next post, you misspelled Kissinger. It’s not “Kisinger.” Wow, that makes you a pretty dumb person.

You really aren’t very good at this.

Sep 18, 2012 7:05pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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