Renewables share of Denmark's power tops 40 pct

COPENHAGEN, Sept 24 Mon Sep 24, 2012 11:22am EDT

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COPENHAGEN, Sept 24 (Reuters) - The share of Denmark's total domestic power supply from renewable sources, mainly wind, exceeded 40 percent for the first time last year, the Danish Energy Agency said on Monday.

The share of renewables rose to 40.7 percent of the domestic electricity supply in 2011, from 34.8 percent in 2010, with the portion from wind rising to 28.1 percent from 21.9 percent, the agency said in its annual statistical review.

Denmark, which has a target to boost the share of its power supply from wind to 50 percent by 2020, has long been the world leader in wind energy.

It has also adopted a goal of getting 100 percent of its energy from renewables by 2050.

The increase in wind power's share in 2011 was due partly to a nearly 4 percent rise in Denmark's installed wind turbines capacity, to 3.95 gigawatts, and due partly to good conditions for wind power generation, the agency's data showed.

Up-to-date international comparisons were not available, but the agency's report showed that in 2010 Denmark was sixth among the 27 Europe Union nations in terms of the share of renewables in its total energy supply, not just the power supply.

Other EU countries with higher shares of renewables in 2010 included those with hydropower, such as Austria, and countries that get a considerable share of their energy from biomass like Lithuania, Sweden and Finland.

Denmark, which is also a producer of North Sea oil and gas, was the only EU country that was self-sufficient in energy in 2011, with its own production exceeding consumption by 10 percent, the agency said.

Larger North Sea oil and gas producer Norway is not in the EU. Fellow North Sea petroleum producers and EU members the UK and the Netherlands consume more energy than they produce, the report showed. (Reporting by John Acher; Editing by Alison Birrane)

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