Syrian mortar bombs land in Israeli orchard

JERUSALEM Tue Sep 25, 2012 4:31am EDT

Related Topics

JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Mortar rounds fired from Syria hit the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights on Tuesday in a spill-over from the conflict in the Arab country.

The Israeli army said the rounds landed harmlessly in an orchard and were not aimed at Israelis.

Israel had lodged a complaint with the United Nations observer force that monitors the de facto truce between the two countries, a military spokesman said.

A source in the area said the orchard belonged to an Israeli agricultural community which lies close to Syrian villages where fighting has flared between Syrian rebels and forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad.

The rounds were apparently fired at the Syrian village of Jubata Al Khashab in response to rebel activity in the area, Israeli media said. A similar incident occurred in the same area on July 23, the army said.

Israel captured the Golan Heights during the 1967 Middle East War and annexed the area in 1981, in a move that was not recognised internationally.

The Israeli military staged an exercise on the Golan Heights last week to test its battle readiness amid tensions over Iran's nuclear program and the civil war in Syria.

(Writing by Ori Lewis; Editing by Angus MacSwan)

FILED UNDER:
We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/
Comments (2)
Tiu wrote:
The mortar landed in Syria, as explained in the last paragraph.

Sep 25, 2012 3:56am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Tiu wrote:
The mortar landed in Syria, as explained in the last paragraph.

Sep 25, 2012 3:56am EDT  --  Report as abuse
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.