Yahoo CEO to return to office one-two weeks after birth of first baby

SAN FRANCISCO Mon Oct 1, 2012 1:59pm EDT

Yahoo! Chief Executive Marissa Mayer listens in a Startup Battlefield session during TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2012 at the San Francisco Design Center Concourse in San Francisco, California September 12, 2012. REUTERS/Stephen Lam

Yahoo! Chief Executive Marissa Mayer listens in a Startup Battlefield session during TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2012 at the San Francisco Design Center Concourse in San Francisco, California September 12, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Stephen Lam

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SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Yahoo Inc Chief Executive Marissa Mayer, three months into a nascent effort to revamp the struggling Web company, could be back in the office in one week, following the birth of her first child on Sunday.

The 37-year-old Mayer will work from home and continues to lead the company and "is involved in all critical decisions making," a Yahoo spokeswoman said on Monday.

"She will be working remotely and is planning to return to the office as soon as possible (likely in 1-2 weeks)," Yahoo told Reuters in an emailed comment.

Mayer, who was an executive at Google before taking the helm at Yahoo, is the company's third permanent CEO in roughly a year. She is leading an effort to revive the company's flagging revenue growth amid competition from Google Inc, Facebook Inc and a new generation of Web start-ups.

Mayer has yet to brief investors on her plan for Yahoo, but she provided some general details to the company's staff in meetings with employees last week.

Women are significantly underrepresented in the ranks of corporate CEOs, and Mayer's announcement of her pregnancy on the same day that she was named Yahoo CEO garnered widespread attention. Her comments at the time in Fortune magazine that she did not plan to take an extended maternity stoked a debate about whether such an example would help or hurt the cause of other women in the workplace.

News of the birth of Mayer's first child was announced on Twitter by her husband, Zachary Bogue, who wrote: "baby boy Bogue born last night. Mom and baby are doing great-we couldn't be more excited!"

(Editing by Leslie Adler)

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Comments (2)
savannahsue wrote:
And Mayer returning to work is news why? (it hasn’t happened yet. She is planning to return to work) Bearing a child isn’t an emergency, nor a disease, not an illness. It’s a forseeable event almost to the day of it’s happening. The woman planned to work soon after the birth. Why that is newsworthy I can’t imagine.

Oct 01, 2012 5:41pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
adp3d wrote:
Yeah, I can’t understand what it is she has to prove. That she is one of the boys? She would be more of a role model to women in executive positions and business in general if she were to take a reasonable amount of maternity leave.

Oct 02, 2012 2:00am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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