Alec Baldwin says he offered to take pay cut to save "30 Rock"

LOS ANGELES Thu Oct 4, 2012 6:02pm EDT

Actor Alec Baldwin accepts the award for outstanding performance by a male actor in a comedy series for ''30 Rock'' at the 18th annual Screen Actors Guild Awards in Los Angeles, California January 29, 2012. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Actor Alec Baldwin accepts the award for outstanding performance by a male actor in a comedy series for ''30 Rock'' at the 18th annual Screen Actors Guild Awards in Los Angeles, California January 29, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson

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LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Actor Alec Baldwin said on Thursday he offered to take a salary cut to keep NBC comedy "30 Rock" on the air.

As the Emmy-winning show starts its 7th and final season on Thursday, Baldwin, who plays the debonair fictional NBC head Jack Donaghy, posted on Twitter; "I offered NBC to cut my pay 20 % in order to have a full 7th and 8th seasons of 30 Rock. I realize times have changed. I am looking forward to some time off."

NBC said in May that the 7th season would be the last for the show, and it would have just 13 episodes rather than the regular 21-23.

The network did not immediately return calls for comment on Baldwin's Twitter remarks.

The show, created by comedian Tina Fey and inspired from her run as head writer for "Saturday Night Live", follows the day-to-day life of fictional NBC sketch comedy show "TGS with Tracy Jordan," starring Fey, Baldwin, Tracy Morgan and Jane Krakowski.

According to Forbes' 2012 Celebrity 100 earnings report, Baldwin earned $15 million in the past year while Fey made $11 million.

"30 Rock" has won 14 Emmy awards, including best comedy series and two for Baldwin as lead actor.

Despite a fervent fan base, the show has only attracted modest ratings, falling from a high of about 7.5 million viewers per episode in 2008/2009 season to an average of 4.6 million last season.

(Reporting By Piya Sinha-Roy, editing by Jill Serjeant and Andrew Hay)

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Comments (7)
Tina Fey is so unfunny. I can’ think of one thing she has written or acted in that was 1/10th as highly regarded by the media audience as it was by the press. Simply stated, I didn’t know the show was even on anymore, and evidently, only 4 million people did.

Oct 04, 2012 7:18pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
rjterpstra wrote:
Guess a ‘CONSERVATIVEONE’ really couldn’t understand such a funny show.

It’s still the funniest on TV and a shame it’s going off the air. Baldwin is a class act. Nice offer on his part.

Hey NBC: Give it another chance!

Oct 04, 2012 8:29pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
tina_rocks wrote:
Really? What have you done that’s garnered 4 million viewers? This show is brilliantly funny and Tina Fey is sharp as a tack. It’s the only show I turn on my tv for anymore. NBC guys are nerf-hearders.

Oct 04, 2012 8:59pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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