Isolated North Korea says its rockets can hit U.S. mainland

SEOUL Tue Oct 9, 2012 6:34am EDT

Rockets are carried by military vehicles during a military parade to celebrate the centenary of the birth of North Korea's founder Kim Il-sung in Pyongyang on April 15, 2012, in this picture released by the North's KCNA news agency on April 16, 2012. REUTERS/KCNA

Rockets are carried by military vehicles during a military parade to celebrate the centenary of the birth of North Korea's founder Kim Il-sung in Pyongyang on April 15, 2012, in this picture released by the North's KCNA news agency on April 16, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/KCNA

SEOUL (Reuters) - Isolated North Korea has rockets that can hit the U.S. mainland, it said on Tuesday, two days after South Korea struck a deal with the United States to extend the range of its ballistic missiles.

North and South Korea have been technically at war since their 1950-53 conflict ended in a truce, not a peace treaty, and regional powers have for years been trying to rein in the North's nuclear weapons program.

North Korea is believed to be developing a long-range missile with a range of 6,700 km (4,160) miles) or more aimed at hitting the United States, but two recent rocket tests both failed.

Its neighbors fear the North is using rocket launches to perfect technology to build a missile capable of delivering a nuclear warhead to the United States.

North Korea's National Defence Commission said in a statement that the North was prepared to counter any U.S. military threats, its KCNA news agency said.

"We do not hide (the fact) that the revolutionary armed forces ... including the strategic rocket forces are keeping within the scope of strike not only the bases of the puppet forces and the U.S. imperialist aggression forces' bases in the inviolable land of Korea, but also Japan, Guam and the U.S. mainland," KCNA said.

South Korea on Sunday unveiled an agreement with the United States that extends the range of its ballistic missiles by more than twice its current limit to 800 km (497 miles) as a deterrent against the North.

North Korea is under heavy U.N. sanctions that have cut off its previously lucrative arms trade and further isolated the state after its failed 2009 missile test drew sharp rebukes, even from its one major ally, China.

The United States has denied it has any intention to strike North Korea. It has more than 20,000 troops stationed in the South in defense of its ally against the North.

In April, under its new leader Kim Jong-un, North Korea again launched a rocket that flew just a few minutes covering a little over 100 km (60 miles) before blowing up over the sea between South Korea and China.

(Reporting by Jack Kim; Editing by Nick Macfie)

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Comments (16)
cyke1 wrote:
Maybe Alaska but not main US. As for them lookin’ to load nukes on them, they aint got the balls to use them. China is one few countries friendly with N. Korea but doubt china would be in a hurry to defend them if they used nukes to attack anyone. Same goes for Iran

Oct 08, 2012 11:14pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Wassup wrote:
Think this is bad? Wait till the idiots in Iran get some decent subs from their buddies Russia and China and have nuclear capability with missles. This is while your esteemed socialist leader does nothing but bow down to the likes of Chavez, Putin and the rest of the Arab community while America debates whether to keep this loser in office for four more years. Preposterous!

Oct 08, 2012 11:15pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Darr247 wrote:
What astute commentary; I hadn’t even realized Chavez and Putin (that’s what SHE said) were part of the Arab community.

Oct 08, 2012 11:53pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
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