U.S., Japan to hold joint military drill amid island row with China

TOKYO Tue Oct 30, 2012 9:45am EDT

A Chinese marine surveillance ship cruises in waters about 28 km (17 miles) northwest of one of the disputed islands called Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, in the East China Sea, in this handout photo released by Japan Coast Guard's 11th Regional Coast Guard headquarters October 25, 2012. REUTERS/11th Regional Coast Guard Headquarters-Japan Coast Guard/Handout

A Chinese marine surveillance ship cruises in waters about 28 km (17 miles) northwest of one of the disputed islands called Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, in the East China Sea, in this handout photo released by Japan Coast Guard's 11th Regional Coast Guard headquarters October 25, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/11th Regional Coast Guard Headquarters-Japan Coast Guard/Handout

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TOKYO (Reuters) - Japan and the United States will hold a biennial joint military exercise in Japan in November in a move likely to further anger China amid heightened tensions between the two Asian giants over disputed islets in the East China Sea.

About 37,400 military personnel from Japan will join some 10,000 U.S. troops in the November 5-16 drill, an official at Japan's Self-Defence Forces said.

China's Defence Ministry spokesman Yang Yujun said last week China was "paying close attention to the relevant moves by the Japanese", when asked about a joint military exercise between the United States and Japan.

Yang also accused Japan of "manufacturing tensions in the region".

In recent weeks, both Japan and China have sent patrol ships to waters near the uninhabited islands, called Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, raising concerns that an unintended collision could develop into a larger clash.

(Reporting by Kiyoshi Takenaka and Sui-Lee Wee; Editing Jeremy Laurence)

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Comments (2)
Abulafiah wrote:
There is no island row. If it were a row, China could take it to arbitration, or at least discussion with ASEAN, but they don’t want to pursue either of those peaceful avenues.

It is not hard to work out why.

Oct 30, 2012 10:23am EDT  --  Report as abuse
Free_Pacific wrote:
When your neighbours keep striking matches, it’s best to be prepared for a fire.

If Japan ventured into Chinese waters with the same arrogant and aggressive stance, China would have fired shots already. This in itself goes to show how peaceful and patient the Japanese are being. They need the unequivocal support of all Island states of the pacific, with minds towards an archipelagic union to forever secure our fish and mineral wealth. Once China and other mainland powers have drunk the earth dry, our seas will be the next target. As is already becoming apparent by massive Chinese incursions and false claims.

Oct 31, 2012 4:52am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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