RPT-Speculators raise bets on US 10-year note futures-CFTC

Fri Nov 2, 2012 4:18pm EDT

NEW YORK, Nov 2 (Reuters) - Bond speculators doubled their
bullish bets on U.S. 10-year Treasury note futures early this
week on worries about severe storm damage and ahead of Friday's
payroll data, according to Commodity Futures Trading Commission
data released on Friday.
    Speculators' net long positions in 10-year Treasury futures
more than doubled to 169,456 contracts on Oct. 30 from 79,296
contracts last week, according to the CFTC's latest Commitments
of Traders data. 
    The latest positions might be skewed by abbreviated trading
activities earlier this week due to Sandy, a devastating storm
that hammered the U.S. Northeast that killed at least 102
people. 
    The U.S. bond market closed early on Monday and stayed shut
on Tuesday.
    Economists had expected modest job growth in October due to
signs of a slowdown in the global economy, which has been
exacerbated by the fiscal troubles in Europe. But the U.S. Labor
Department reported on Friday that employers added 171,000 jobs
last month, more than the 125,000 predicted by economists.
 
    On Friday, 10-year Treasury futures ended nearly unchanged
on the day at 132-26/32, while the yield on cash 10-year
Treasury notes finished steady at 1.72 percent.
 
    In the meantime, speculators pared their short bets against
two- and 30-year Treasury futures.
    There were 15,320 more speculative short positions in
30-year Treasury bond futures compared with long positions on
Tuesday. A week earlier, there were 23,835 more speculative
shorts in T-bond futures than longs. 
    Net speculative short bets on two-year T-notes fell to 3,245
contracts from 5,546 last week. 
    As for other Treasury futures, net speculative long bets on
five-year T-note futures fell to 56,142 contracts from 83,226
the prior week, the data showed. 
    Speculative bets on the Chicago Board of Trade's "ultra"
bond contracts changed in the latest week. There were 8,061 more
speculative short positions than longs on Tuesday. A week
earlier, there were 6,456 more speculative long contracts than
shorts, the data showed.