In Missouri Senate race, new Akin ad features rape survivor

KANSAS CITY, Missouri Thu Nov 1, 2012 8:43pm EDT

U.S. Senate candidate Todd Akin speaks to the media after a rally outside the Missouri Capitol with the New Women's Group in Jefferson City, Missouri September 21, 2012. REUTERS/Sarah Conard

U.S. Senate candidate Todd Akin speaks to the media after a rally outside the Missouri Capitol with the New Women's Group in Jefferson City, Missouri September 21, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Sarah Conard

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KANSAS CITY, Missouri (Reuters) - Todd Akin, the Republican candidate in the closely watched U.S. Senate race in Missouri, released a new advertisement on Thursday featuring a woman who says she was raped and had an abortion but supports Akin's anti-abortion stand.

The TV commercial comes in the closing days of a campaign that has drawn national attention because of Akin's remark in August that women's bodies could ward off pregnancy in cases of "legitimate rape."

Akin, a six-term U.S. congressman from the St. Louis area, was heavily criticized by Democrats and lost support from some leading Republicans because of his remark.

A poll by Mason-Dixon Polling & Research released five days ago showed Akin trailing incumbent Democratic Senator Claire McCaskill by just 2 percentage points. He also has regained some of his Republican backing as the party tries to wrest control of the U.S. Senate from the Democrats in Tuesday's election.

The new ad features a woman named Kelly who says she is a full-time student and plans to vote for Akin, who opposes abortion even in cases of rape.

"I'm a woman who's had an abortion. I've been raped in the past," the woman says. "The reason I'm voting for Todd and that I'm so proud of him is because he defends the unborn."

The woman does not say whether she aborted a pregnancy caused by rape. A spokesman for the Akin campaign did not return a telephone call seeking clarification.

McCaskill, who supports abortion rights, has made an issue of Akin's "legitimate rape" comment in some of her commercials.

On Thursday, she released an ad reminding voters that Republican presidential challenger Mitt Romney and some former Republican senators from Missouri denounced Akin's rape comments.

(Editing by James B. Kelleher and Will Dunham)

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Comments (2)
dill16078 wrote:
According to Akin’s logic, then, she must have been “illegitimately” raped. Shame on her.

Nov 01, 2012 9:22pm EDT  --  Report as abuse
Nostrildamnus wrote:
Akin’s illogics would also necessitate christians to accept that the purported progeny birthed of the purported Nephilims’ concoursing with earthly women should also have been treated with the same respect, for these creatures would have also have been gifted of the life-spirit, intentionally, by the “Almighty Yowie”.
Makes a mockery of the notion that “god” gave man free will of self-determination and obedience, doesn’t it?
By the same illogics that a rapist may be used by “god” to bring into the world, progeny whose existence is supposedly ordained by “god” even before the world was formed, may also be used to justify Hitler’s genocidal and maniacal acts to allow Israel’s reformation prophecy to come to pass; and each German who shot an allied solder, and each allied soldier who shot a German soldier, was merely unknowingly performing such acts on behalf of “The Yowie’s” will.
Actually, one should be sincerely thankfull to Akin ~ for he indeed, in his gross ignorance, aptly exposed the legs of clay upon which his religion is built.

Nov 02, 2012 5:55am EDT  --  Report as abuse
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