WRAPUP 4-Obama, Romney focus on swing states in late campaigning

Mon Nov 5, 2012 6:21pm EST

* Polls show Obama and Romney essentially deadlocked

* Reuters/Ipsos poll has Obama at 48 pct, Romney 46 pct

* Obama visiting three swing states Monday, Romney four

By Steve Holland

WASHINGTON, Nov 5 (Reuters) - President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney engaged in frantic get-out-the-vote efforts and made final pleas to voters on Monday in a sprint through battleground states that will determine who wins their agonizingly close White House race.

Both candidates sought to generate strong turnout from supporters and to sway independent voters to their side in the last hours of a race that polls showed was deadlocked nationally. Obama had a slight lead in the eight or nine battleground states that will decide the race on Tuesday's Election Day.

The latest Reuters/Ipsos national poll of likely voters, a daily tracking poll, gave Obama a slight edge, with 48 percent support compared to Romney's 46 percent. The difference was within the 3.4 percentage point credibility interval, which allows for statistical variation in Internet-based polls.

Obama was up 4 percentage points in must-win Ohio, 50 percent to 46 percent, and held slimmer leads in Virginia and Colorado. Romney led in Florida by 1 percentage point, the poll found.

The president, with a final day itinerary that included stops in Wisconsin, Ohio and Iowa, urged voters to stick with him and trust that his economic policies are working. Traveling with him was rocker Bruce Springsteen.

"Ohio, I'm not ready to give up on the fight. I've got a whole lot of fight left in me and I hope you do too," Obama told supporters in Columbus, Ohio.

Romney's final day included stops in Florida, Virginia, Ohio and New Hampshire. He pledged that he would handle the economy better than Obama and jabbed his opponent for blaming Republican predecessor George W. Bush for the weak economy.

"I won't waste any time complaining about my predecessor. And I won't spend my time trying to pass partisan legislation rather than working to help America get back to work," Romney said in Fairfax, Virginia.

The candidates are seeking to piece together the 270 Electoral College votes needed for victory in the state-by-state battle for the presidency. Despite the close national opinion polls, Obama has an easier path to victory: If he won the three states he was visiting on Monday - Wisconsin, Ohio and Iowa - then he would likely carry the day.

OHIO COULD BE DECISIVE

All eyes were on the Midwestern state of Ohio, whose 18 electoral votes could be decisive. Romney, looking for any edge possible, planned last-second visits on Tuesday to both Ohio and Pennsylvania, aides said.

Visits to the areas around Cleveland and Pittsburgh would be aimed at driving turnout. And the Pittsburgh stop could be as much about Ohio as Pennsylvania, since many in eastern Ohio watch Pittsburgh television.

Romney's path to the White House becomes much harder should he lose Ohio. The state has been leaning toward Obama - its unemployment rate is lower than the 7.9 percent national average and its heavy dependence on auto-related jobs meant the bailout to auto companies that Obama pursued in 2009 is popular.

Both campaigns expressed confidence that their candidate would win, and there were enough polls to bolster either view.

There were clear signs that Obama held an edge. A CNN/ORC poll, for instance, showed him up in Ohio by 50 percent to 47 percent.

The close margins in state and national polls suggested the possibility of a cliffhanger that could be decided by which side has the best turnout operation and gets its voters to the polls.

CHALLENGES AHEAD

Whoever wins will have a host of challenges to confront. The top priority will be the looming "fiscal cliff" of spending cuts and tax increases that would begin with the new year.

The balance of power in Congress also will be at stake on Tuesday, with Obama's Democrats now expected to narrowly hold their Senate majority and Romney's Republicans favored to retain control of the House of Representatives.

In a race where the two candidates and their party allies raised a combined $2 billion, the most in U.S. history, both sides have pounded the heavily contested battleground states with an unprecedented barrage of ads.

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Comments (2)
jars13 wrote:
I know with all the lies and flip flops Romney/Ryan are counting on uninformed voters ( never dreamed they would get this much support). For a man that got rich outsourcing our jobs and doesn’t believe the rich need to pay taxes it falls in line with those trying to buy him the election. Romney’s style of business experience is what got us here in the first place. Wake up America, do some research and see who this man really is and look at who’s trying to buy the election for him. More of the agenda of Big Oil, Big Banks and Wall street is the last thing we need after what we have been through.
Here is a video showing some of Romney’s flip flops http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQwrB1vu74c
Here is a video showing some of Romney’s lies http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zax-iuCXcWQ&feature=player_detailpage
Every vote is going to count this time.

Nov 05, 2012 1:49am EST  --  Report as abuse
Jimini wrote:
If you employed Obama to fix your companies bottom line and he had 4 years and your company was now on the verge of bankrupcy would you renew his contract for another 4 years?

Jars13 is a bit paranoid, Romney has proven successful experience, Obama has proven to be a total failure.

Nov 05, 2012 4:59am EST  --  Report as abuse
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