Colombia leaves pact recognizing U.N. court rulings

BOGOTA Wed Nov 28, 2012 12:14pm EST

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BOGOTA (Reuters) - Colombia has withdrawn from a treaty that binds it to the U.N. International Court of Justice in anger at a ruling that shifts some of its resource-rich waters to Nicaragua, President Juan Manuel Santos said on Wednesday.

The Hague-based court ruled last week that a cluster of disputed islands in the western Caribbean belonged to Colombia and not to Nicaragua, but drew a demarcation line in favor of Managua in the nearby waters.

The decision, which reduced the expanse of sea belonging to Colombia, set off a scramble in Bogota to see how to overturn the verdict and avoid diplomatic conflict with Nicaragua's President Daniel Ortega, who said he had sent ships to the area.

Meanwhile, Santos ordered the Colombian navy to remain in the waters granted to Managua.

"The highest national interests demand that territorial and maritime limits are set by agreements as has always been the case in Colombian judicial tradition, and not via rulings uttered by the International Court of Justice," Santos said.

"This is the moment for national unity. This is the moment that the country has to unite."

Colombian Foreign Minister Maria Angela Holguin was to provide further details to reporters later on Wednesday.

The 1948 treaty, known as the Bogota Pact, recognizes ICJ rulings to find peaceful solutions to signatories' conflicts.

Leaving the pact would mean Colombia is not obliged to heed the court's ruling on any potential bids by Nicaragua to seek additional territory, the government has said.

But its withdrawal would not have a retroactive effect, and it would be obliged to comply with last week's ruling.

Ortega has said he expects Colombia to recognize the court decision, which is binding, but experts have said Colombia may reject it and seek to negotiate a new border pact.

Santos has not yet said whether he will accept the latest ICJ decision. He rejected the changes to the border, saying the ruling had "omissions, mistakes, excesses, inconsistencies, that we can not accept."

Nicaragua's continental shelf and economic exclusion zone in the Caribbean was increased by the court ruling, giving it access to potential underwater oil and gas deposits as well as fishing rights.

In 2007, the court ruled in a long-running dispute between the two countries that three large islands of San Andres, Providencia and Santa Catalina belonged to Colombia.

(Additional reporting by Luis Jaime Acosta in Bogota; Editing by Bill Trott)

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