China considering attending U.S.-hosted military exercise

BEIJING Thu Nov 29, 2012 5:18am EST

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BEIJING (Reuters) - China's Defence Ministry said on Thursday it was considering a U.S. invitation to attend military drills in the Pacific, in what would be a rare case of cooperation between the countries that share deep military suspicions.

Asked to confirm if U.S. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus, recently in Beijing, had invited China to attend the U.S.-hosted multi-nation Rimpac maritime exercises, Defence Ministry spokesman Geng Yansheng said that was the case.

"The Chinese side thanks the U.S. side for the invite, and will give it positive consideration," he told a monthly news briefing, according to a transcript posted on the ministry's website. Foreign reporters are not allowed to attend.

This year's Rimpac involved more than 22 nations, including Russia, Japan and India, in waters off Hawaii, but China was not invited. The next one is scheduled for 2014.

China and the United States, the world's two largest economies, have had an on-again, off-again defence relationship in recent years.

Two years ago China severed all military ties over U.S. arms sales to self-ruled Taiwan. Beijing has never renounced the use of force to bring the island under its control.

Pentagon officials have long complained that China has not been candid enough about its rapid military build-up, whereas Chinese officials have accused Washington of viewing their country in suspicious, "Cold War" terms.

U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta urged China in September to expand military relations with the United States to reduce the risk of confrontation.

This week, Chinese and U.S. officers are holding a disaster management exercise in China's southwestern city of Chengdu.

However, China's military modernization continues apace. It has territorial disputes with Japan and various Southeast Asian nations in the South China Sea.

(Reporting by Ben Blanchard; Editing by Robert Birsel)

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Comments (2)
Apparently America’s supercapitalists will do anything to maintain their ability to have their manufacturing done more-cheaply in China, including dictating that the US government reveal to China the US military strategy and tactics that the Chinese spies not yet yet been able to steal, to make it easier for China to wage war against the US, or intimidate the US into submission to China’s political and economic demands in the inevitable future conflict. China has been at war with the US unofficially since 1947, and officially since 1951.

Nov 29, 2012 7:44am EST  --  Report as abuse
Janeallen wrote:
@collard:
Stop defaming the United States.

The United States have contributed greatly to peace and development in Asia since Pearl Harbor. Not only did we liberate most of Asia by stopping Japanese-Germain Third Reich’s plans of controlling Asia, we have helped Japan and given it extremely preferential treatment in trade and international standing, under which the Japanese economy have prospered since WWII.

Though the fine details of execution could have been done very differently and more successfully with hind sight, many millions people in the free world benefited from American military operations, namely the successful democratization of S. Korea and the building of prosperous economies in S. Korea and Taiwan.

Your statement that China and U.S. have been at war since 1947, or 1951, is false on its face. Your entire blog is a despicable effort to sabotage world peace, and put down honorable American efforts to maintain balance of the greatest military powers, to avoid a disastrous third world war, which would have destroyed the world due to the availability of nuclear weapons by many countries.

I don’t know where you are from, but the vast majority of posts with this defamatory, and inflammatory tone come from Japan, with nothing but vile intention to promote war, military conflict and undermine peace efforts, and distract from its internal economic recession and dysfunctional political situation.

The entire world is under great economic strife.
It is the duty of every responsible world citizen to do one’s own share to minimize the chances of military conflict, avoid warmongering actions like the ones Japan recently engaged in, so that more resources can be put back to ordinary civilians, into job growth, healthcare, education, scientific development, green energy development that will protect the world from global warming.

Your sarcastic tone only counters the effort of world peace.

China has never invaded Japan, or the Philippines, or Bornea, or the United States, or Europe or Africa.
Many other countries have track record of invading these places.
For example, the Philippines have a history of being colonized by Spain, United States and Japan, Europe by the Mongols, Africa by various European powers.

To inflame fear of war, instead of fostering peaceful relationship, by blatant distortion of history, reflects an insidious and nefarious agenda. Among other distortion of historical truths in your post,
is your distortion of the historical fact that China & the United States have official normalized relationships on Jan 1st, 1979.
China and the United States are mutually dependent on each other to get out of the current economic challenges. Without China lending money to the United States, United States would have had trouble in providing stimulus money that successfully bailed out our car industry, and banks, among other American enterprises. The loan from China was essentially done with net zero interest return so far in the past 4 years.(That’s because the loan was in U.S. dollars, and U.S. dollars have depreciated 11% since the beginning of Obama Administration, thus essentially rendered the loan to be interest free).

@collard’s post is typical of many that have distorted historical facts, or at least, slanted the facts so grossly that the facial meaning deviates significantly from any possible objective viewing of the facts.

The truth is: American military is so much larger and stronger than any other country’s at present, there is no threat from any Asian countries towards our national security at this point. We voted for Obama, four years ago, and again recently, with a mandate to place more of our resources on building people, promoting better lives, and away from military buildup.

For China and the United States to engage in joint military exercises, is a superb idea. The joint exercise will be symbolic, much like the Ping Pong exchange decades ago. We continued to grow economically after cultural, educational and economic exchanges developed between China and the United States since.

I have no doubt that neither country will spill any of its deepest security secrets. The reassurance is that both leaders should remember that any unnecessary military conflicts, threaten to put the world back into recession. There is a lack of economic engine right now. And the warmongering of Japan recently hurt and did not help the world’s economy. For Obama and China to take the lead in cooperation, while maintaining honest and constructive dialogs in ironing out any trade disputes by submitting to international courts or WTO, like they have been doing, is exactly the right thing to do, for the greater good of the world.

All in all, I applaud this symbolic gesture, that will enhance investors’ confidence in investing in industries and commercial ventures in both countries. I hope that the world will take reassurance from these exercises, and feel confident to invest, thus leading to greater economic growth rate at large.

Nov 29, 2012 7:00pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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