No "substantive" progress made on fiscal cliff: Boehner

WASHINGTON Thu Nov 29, 2012 12:02pm EST

1 of 2. U.S. House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, November 28, 2012. Boehner voiced optimism that Republicans could broker a deal with the White House to avoid year-end austerity measures, saying on Wednesday that Republicans were willing to put revenues on the table if Democrats agreed to spending cuts.

Credit: Reuters/Yuri Gripas

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - House Speaker John Boehner said on Thursday that no substantive progress has been made to avoid the "fiscal cliff" of spending cuts and tax hikes that will start to go into effect early next year if Washington does not act.

"Listen, I remain hopeful that productive conversations can be had in the days ahead. But the White House has to get serious," House of Representatives Speaker Boehner told reporters after a meeting with Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner and the White House's main liaison to Congress.

Boehner characterized the discussion with Geithner as frank but said the treasury secretary did not provide a substantive plan for dealing with the fiscal cliff.

(Reporting By Dave Lawder and Rachelle Younglai; Editing by Vicki Allen)

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Comments (3)
flashrooster wrote:
The hypocrisy is yours, dumbo2001. It’s people like you that allow people like Geithner to get away without paying taxes. Geez, just look at the guy the right chose as their Presidential nominee. So put up or shut up. Until you’re ready to insist that the rich pay their fair share, you really have no right to complain about Geithner. Run Romney as your nominee but criticize Geithner for not paying his fair share in taxes? Please. Talk about hypocrisy.

All you have to do is advocate for closing tax loopholes and insisting that the wealthy pay their fair share. Then, and only then, will you have the right to complain about Geithner. But so far I haven’t seen that coming from you. Just unsubstantiated attacks against Americans who think and a whole lot of whining.

Nov 29, 2012 12:48pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Doc62 wrote:
Lateralgs has it right. Ignore stambo2001. He is a whiney teabag sore LOSER. Next he’ll spout Racist innuendos in the hope of getting a rise out of you. We are above him.

Nov 29, 2012 12:59pm EST  --  Report as abuse
xyz2055 wrote:
Man! This is really hard work! NOT! Get out a piece of paper on one side title the column Revenue. On the other side Spending cuts. Each side writes down their ideas, the CBO determines the dollar value of each and then you negotiate from there. Negotiate a goal, say $4T in a combination of revenue and cuts over the next 10 years. My suggestion is to quit cherry picking this thing. Put everything on the table. Everybody gives up something..that way neither side takes all the blame. It’s called “Compromise”! and it’s what we expect Congress to do, work with each other to get the job done. STOP THE CAMPAIGNING IN FRONT OF THE NEWS CAMERAS! JOHN!

Nov 29, 2012 7:05pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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