White House: Debt ceiling should be raised without drama

WASHINGTON Thu Nov 29, 2012 1:43pm EST

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The White House said on Thursday that raising the debt ceiling should not be tied in a political way to spending cuts that Republicans are seeking as part of a deal to solve U.S. fiscal problems.

"Asking ... that a political price be paid in order for Congress to do its job to ensure that the United States of America pays its bills and does not default for the first time in its history is deeply irresponsible," White House spokesman Jay Carney told a briefing.

Carney said the debt ceiling should be raised soon and without drama.

(Reporting by Jeff Mason and Matt Spetalnick; Editing by Sandra Maler)

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Comments (14)
Chazz wrote:
And Barack Obama said:

“The fact that we are here today to debate raising America’s debt limit is a sign of leadership failure…
It is a sign that the U.S. Government can’t pay its own bills…It is a sign that we now depend on ongoing financial assistance from foreign countries to finance our Government’s reckless fiscal policies.

… Increasing America’s debt weakens us domestically and internationally. Leadership means that ‘the buck stops here. Instead, Washington is shifting the burden of bad choices today onto the backs of our children and grandchildren.

America has a debt problem and a failure of leadership… Americans deserve better.” ……..
- Senator Barack Obama, on raising the Debt Ceiling in 2006

Nov 29, 2012 2:24pm EST  --  Report as abuse
stambo2001 wrote:
“The fact that we are here today to debate raising America’s debt limit is a sign of leadership failure. It is a sign that the U.S. “Government can’t pay its own bills. It is a sign that we now depend on ongoing financial assistance from foreign countries to finance our Government’s reckless fiscal policies. … Increasing America’s debt weakens us domestically and internationally. Leadership means that “the buck stops here.” Instead, Washington is shifting the burden of bad choices today onto the backs of our children and grandchildren. America has a debt problem and a failure of leadership. Americans deserve better.” – pre-’evolved’ Barrack Hussein Obama (2006).

But, the republicans are the ‘flip-floppers’?!? Complete and utter reversal of position from what he originally ran on, right in their face, and they STILL deny it. His followers cheer him when he stands against raising the debt and then they cheer him when he wants to raise the debt?! It’s like a cut-out scene from the movie ‘The Dictator’. You cannot rationalize with crazy. America is doomed.

Nov 29, 2012 2:35pm EST  --  Report as abuse
jaham wrote:
Let’s say Obama gets his $1.6T from taxing the rich over ten years, that will be enough only to repay the $1.59T he blew his 2011 budget by.

That leaves $1T+ deficits projected every year going forward, $16T in national debt, and $52T in unfunded entitlement liabilities to pay for….the arithmetic clearly exposes our problem as being FAR too large to solve via taxation.

Now you can clearly, mathematically see that even AFTER Obama’s tax the rich plan is effected, we have some daunting debts to rectify.

Obama and the Dems currently have not put forth any semblance of a feasible plan on this front; what’s worse: They may NEVER address spending cuts and entitlement reform in earnest because it would be politically unpalatable….

Nov 29, 2012 2:41pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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