Euro zone set for recovery in second-half of 2013: Draghi

PARIS Fri Nov 30, 2012 7:59am EST

European Central Bank President Mario Draghi (C) waves after a news conference after the Governing Council Meeting of the European Central Bank in Brdo near Kranj, October 4, 2012. REUTERS/Srdjan Zivulovic

European Central Bank President Mario Draghi (C) waves after a news conference after the Governing Council Meeting of the European Central Bank in Brdo near Kranj, October 4, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Srdjan Zivulovic

PARIS (Reuters) - European Central Bank President Mario Draghi said on Friday that budgetary consolidation in the euro zone would entail a short-term economic impact but the currency bloc was on track for a recovery in the second half of 2013.

"We have not yet emerged from the crisis," Draghi told Europe 1 radio. "The recovery for most of the euro zone will certainly begin in the second half of 2013."

"It's true that budgetary consolidation entails a short-term contraction of economic activity, but this budgetary consolidation is inevitable," Draghi said, speaking through a translator.

Draghi, in Paris for a conference with top financial officials, said euro zone governments should push ahead quickly with implementing a banking union which must apply to all banks to avoid fragmenting the sector.

Berlin has said that unified banking supervision under the aegis of the ECB should apply only to the bloc's largest banks.

To achieve deeper integration, member states must accept ceding more sovereignty while pursuing structural reforms to reduce rigidity in the service and labor markets, notably in France and Italy, Draghi added.

Ratings agency Standard & Poor's stripped six euro zone states of their 'AAA' credit rating in January, and Moody's downgraded France's rating by one notch this month to Aa1.

Draghi said that while the downgrades did not have an immediate impact on borrowing costs, they were a signal to governments which must be taken seriously.

(Reporting By Nicholas Vinocur; Editing by Daniel Flynn)

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Comments (4)
SeaWa wrote:
Oh, come on. All this stuff is made up. The financial markets themselves are just made up. All make believe. Up and down, up and down, etc, etc, etc. Getting pretty sick of the roller coaster political spinning. All lies. There is no such thing as money, there is no such thing as financial markets. It’s all just a bunch of numbers on a spreadsheet. It’s all made up garbage. They lie about the future in hopes of making it come to pass. It’s all power game, nothing is real.

Nov 30, 2012 7:43pm EST  --  Report as abuse
SeaWa wrote:
Oh, come on. All this stuff is made up. The financial markets themselves are just made up. All make believe. Up and down, up and down, etc, etc, etc. Getting pretty sick of the roller coaster political spinning. All lies. There is no such thing as money, there is no such thing as financial markets. It’s all just a bunch of numbers on a spreadsheet. It’s all made up garbage. They lie about the future in hopes of making it come to pass. It’s all power game, nothing is real.

Nov 30, 2012 7:43pm EST  --  Report as abuse
dareconomics wrote:
One of the reason that the Eurocrisis continues to worsen is that politicians are basing their crisis fighting on unrealistically strong economic growth in the near future.

Spain and Greece continue to collapse at a faster rate than official projections, Italy is in a recession, and France and the U.K. are basically stagnant over the last year or so. Germany has managed slow growth, which is better than nothing.

The whole EU has been in a recession for 2012, but these facts do not stop Mario Draghi from proclaiming that the EU will begin growing in the second half of 2013.

Growth can only come from increased demand. While an export boom driven by the growth in the rest of the world will help, Europe does most of its trading with itself, so it desperately needs the revival of internal demand.

This revival requires that Europe take some chances to solve the Eurocrisis, which is not happening before German elections. Watch for the EU to remain in recession for the rest of 2013 with budget deficits worsening across the entire continent.

dareconomics.wordpress.com

Dec 01, 2012 8:53pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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