North Korea urged to drop rocket launch plan

MOSCOW/BEIJING Mon Dec 3, 2012 9:52am EST

A lorry carrying a unit of the Patriot Advanced Capability-3 (PAC-3) missiles is loaded onto Japan's Maritime Self-Defense Force's (MSDF) transport vessel Osumi at an MSDF base in Kure, Hiroshima Prefecture, in this photo taken by Kyodo December 3, 2012. Japan expedited deploying the PAC-3 missile interceptors in Okinawa Prefecture to prepare for North Korea's planned rocket launch, Kyodo news reported. Mandatory Credit REUTERS/Kyodo

A lorry carrying a unit of the Patriot Advanced Capability-3 (PAC-3) missiles is loaded onto Japan's Maritime Self-Defense Force's (MSDF) transport vessel Osumi at an MSDF base in Kure, Hiroshima Prefecture, in this photo taken by Kyodo December 3, 2012. Japan expedited deploying the PAC-3 missile interceptors in Okinawa Prefecture to prepare for North Korea's planned rocket launch, Kyodo news reported. Mandatory Credit

Credit: Reuters/Kyodo

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MOSCOW/BEIJING (Reuters) - Russia and China urged North Korea on Monday not to go ahead with a plan for its second rocket launch of 2012, with Moscow saying any such move would violate restrictions imposed by the U.N. Security Council.

North Korea's state news agency on Saturday announced the decision to launch another space satellite and reportedly told neighbors it would take a similar path to that planned for a failed rocket launch in April.

"We urgently appeal to the government (of North Korea) to reconsider the decision to launch a rocket," the Russian Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

North Korea on Monday notified the U.N. shipping agency, the International Maritime Organization, about the launch, which was scheduled to take place between December 10 and December 22 at between 11.00 a.m. and 5.00 p.m. EST.

The rocket's first stage drop-off would take place off the west coast of the Korean Peninsula, while the second stage would occur off the Philippines - both stages nowhere near Japan, coordinates provided by Pyongyang showed.

Echoing its criticism of the April launch, Russia said North Korea had been warned not to ignore a U.N. Security Council resolution which "unambiguously prohibits (it) from launching rockets using ballistic technology".

China was not so direct in its criticism of North Korea, but urged "all sides" not to take any action that "worsens the problem".

"China believes that maintaining peace and stability on the Korean peninsula and in Northeast Asia accords with the interests of all sides and is the joint responsibility of all sides," Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei told reporters.

"In the present circumstances, we hope all sides can be calm and restrained and not take any moves to worsen the problem. China will remain in touch and coordinate with all sides."

In Washington, U.S. State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland condemned the launch plan on Sunday, calling it a provocative threat to the Asia-Pacific region.

ELECTION IN SOUTH

North Korea says its rockets are used to put satellites into orbit for peaceful purposes. Russia said in its statement North Korea would be allowed to exercise its right to peaceful activity in space only if the U.N.-imposed restrictions were lifted.

The warnings come just weeks before South Korea's December 19 presidential election in which how to handle North Korea is a major campaign issue. The isolated North has for years tried to influence major events in the South by issuing propaganda or launching armed attacks.

North and South Korea have been technically at war since their 1950-53 conflict ended in a truce, not a peace treaty, and regional powers have for years been trying to rein in the North's nuclear program.

Countries trying to stop North Korea's arms program believe it is using rocket launches to perfect technology to build a missile arsenal capable of delivering a nuclear warhead to the United States.

North Korea is under U.N. sanctions that ban trading in missile or nuclear technology that have driven its already dire economy deeper in trouble by cutting off what was once a lucrative source of hard cash.

Russia has often balanced criticism of the nuclear activities and missile launches of North Korea, a Soviet-era client state, with calls on other powers to refrain from belligerent actions against it, which Moscow says can be counterproductive.

Russia is a permanent member of the U.N. Security Council and is upset by any defiance of council resolutions. Past launches by Pyongyang have caused concern among Russians living near the country's border with North Korea.

(Additional reporting by Ben Blanchard in Beijing and Jonathan Saul in London,; Writing by Steve Gutterman and Nick Macfie; Editing by Robert Birsel and Mark Heinrich)

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Comments (3)
rebound wrote:
Time to let North Korea know we are the best and shut down their silly attempts to dominate our decisions with China trumpeting their innocence. North Korea will continue to launch ballistic missiles in an attempt to gain military influence. We all know they keep 95% of their population as slaves without knowledge of the outside world by limiting the use of a vast amount of technology. They are just trying to gain influence through sham peaceful operations to actual military wielding operations of which is their sole purpose. They want to scare the rest of the world but they have to lie to get their. By any means possible I see. We should blast their missile out of they sky. They would lie to their people and say it was a error in the calibration or something because they can never be honest, even with their own people.

Dec 03, 2012 4:07am EST  --  Report as abuse
CatGarfield wrote:
Every country in the world has the right to launch satellite for peaceful use, including North Korea. However, this project could be too big for North Korea. Considering South Korea whose economy is much better than the North also keeps trying their own rockets and has already failed twice (they will launch a new one soon), I dont think the North has enough resources and technology to launch rockets successfully. the more rockets they produce, the sooner collapse coming.

Dec 03, 2012 7:22am EST  --  Report as abuse
BCerentano wrote:
@ CatGarfield…

Every country in the world has the right, except those prohibited by UN sanctions (unless, of course, North Korea has found a way to launch satellites without using ballistic rockets).

Dec 03, 2012 11:33am EST  --  Report as abuse
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