Boehner says stalemate persists in "fiscal cliff" talks

WASHINGTON Fri Dec 7, 2012 11:24am EST

U.S. House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) gestures during a news conference on the fiscal cliff, after a closed GOP meeting at Capitol Hill in Washington, December 5, 2012. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

U.S. House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) gestures during a news conference on the fiscal cliff, after a closed GOP meeting at Capitol Hill in Washington, December 5, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Yuri Gripas

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - House Speaker John Boehner said on Friday that talks this week with President Barack Obama produced no progress, and he renewed his demand that the president provide a new offer to avert "the fiscal cliff."

At a Capitol Hill news conference, Boehner accused the president of "slow-walking the economy" toward a crush of automatic spending cuts and tax hikes at year-end.

(Reporting By Thomas Ferraro and Kim Dixon; Editing by Doina Chiacu)

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Comments (5)
AlkalineState wrote:
Stalemate persists? Good. The fiscal cliff is what we needed anyway, and it kicks in automatically in January if ‘stalemate persists.’

Let the bush tax cuts expire, raise revenue, cut spending across the board. It’s what we needed to start 8 years ago.

Dec 07, 2012 11:30am EST  --  Report as abuse
flashrooster wrote:
The only way we can adequately cut spending in healthcare entitlements is to reform our healthcare system in a way that takes the profit out of it. Otherwise, we’ll have to keep coming back to these fiscal cliffs as healthcare costs keep rising. In the meantime spending “cuts” mean nothing more than cutting benefits to Americans who need those benefits.

We need affordable healthcare. Politicians are always saying that government’s #1 job (when it’s not getting rid of Obama) is to protect the people. They are failing miserably on the healthcare front. Death is death, whether you’re dying from illness or from a terrorist attack. We need to do better, and save ourselves a lot of money, both as individuals and for our government.

Dec 07, 2012 12:15pm EST  --  Report as abuse
jaham wrote:
I’m starting to think the GOP should do just as Rand Paul suggested: a “strategic retreat”

Let the Democrats craft and implement whatever tax increases they want; don’t tie it to the spending cuts or entitlement reforms we need or anything else. Let them go to the extreme: If they want to tax the rich at 90% and triple the capital gains rate, fine, let them own it.

The GOP will vote present in the House and No in the Senate and Obama, Reid, and Pelosi can craft a tax increase on a stagnant economy and own the externalities and fallout from it.

If this is a battle of two polar ideologies and the public has been steered towards a farcical focus and desire for taxation, let them have it. Let them see what the liberal economic philosophy (if you can call it that, LOL) will bear…then the GOP will have more solid footing to espouse a feasible and logical economic strategy based on liberty, conservatism, and the constitution.

Dec 07, 2012 2:36pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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