U.S.-Mexican singer Jenni Rivera dies in plane crash

MEXICO CITY Mon Dec 10, 2012 12:38am EST

Civil Protection personnel inspect the perimeter of the crash site of a plane with Mexican-American singer Jenni Rivera on board, in the municipality of Iturbide, south of Monterrey December 9, 2012. Rivera died in a plane crash after the small jet she was travelling in went down in northern Mexico, her father said on Sunday. Speaking after the wreckage was discovered, the singer's father, Pedro Rivera, told Telemundo television all seven of the people on board the plane, including two pilots, had died. REUTERS/Stringer

Civil Protection personnel inspect the perimeter of the crash site of a plane with Mexican-American singer Jenni Rivera on board, in the municipality of Iturbide, south of Monterrey December 9, 2012. Rivera died in a plane crash after the small jet she was travelling in went down in northern Mexico, her father said on Sunday. Speaking after the wreckage was discovered, the singer's father, Pedro Rivera, told Telemundo television all seven of the people on board the plane, including two pilots, had died.

Credit: Reuters/Stringer

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MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexican-American singer Jenni Rivera died in a plane crash after the small jet she was travelling in went down in northern Mexico, her father said on Sunday.

A spokesman for the state government of Nuevo Leon said investigators had found the remains of Rivera's Learjet, which disappeared from the radar 62 miles from the northern city of Monterrey at about 3:30 a.m. local time/4.30 a.m. EST.

Speaking after the wreckage was discovered, the singer's father, Pedro Rivera, told Telemundo television all seven of the people on board the plane, including two pilots, had died.

"Everyone was lost," Rivera said, flanked by two sons.

Investigators are still searching the crash site in the municipality of Iturbide, south of Monterrey. The transportation and communications ministry said the wreckage was strewn so far and wide that it was hard to recognize anything.

It was not clear what caused the crash.

Rivera, 43, was heading for the city of Toluca in central Mexico after a concert in Monterrey on Saturday night.

Born in Long Beach, California, to Mexican immigrants, Rivera sold some 15 million records in her career, won several awards and received Grammy nominations, her website said.

A mother of five, Rivera was a renowned performer of the Nortena and Banda musical styles.

(Writing by Dave Graham; Editing by Philip Barbara and Stacey Joyce)

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Comments (3)
americanguy wrote:
Flying is the least safe way to travel if you calculate it based on death rates for total miles traveled each year, instead of total trips per year. The “flying is safe” myth is the biggiest lie corporations have ever put on the world. You are a 3000 times more likely to die in a plane crash than in a car wreck based on death rates per miles traveled per year. I should know, I did a thesis on the subject (using industry and government statistics and facts), got an “A”, and my thesis was quickly swept under the rug. I used to fly, and my choice of the subject for my thesis was made after I lost several friends and family members over the years in aircraft crashes, including commercial airliner crashes.

Dec 10, 2012 7:46am EST  --  Report as abuse
dibeanie wrote:
Useful info, americanguy… shouldn’t be swept under any rug!
R.I.P. Jenni Rivera. Good thoughts for your family/children.

Dec 10, 2012 1:35pm EST  --  Report as abuse
eMJayy wrote:
@americanguy – Yeah…right.
You obviously did your thesis while harbouring a personal bias against flying…so I can’t assume your calculations or findings are likely to be credible. Statistics can be twisted to shape just about any result, especially when bias is involved and especially when irrelevant metrics are used.

If flying was so much less safe relative to driving, why is it that far more pilots have perished in car accidents than in plane crashes? If a passenger boarded a flight at random, once a day, everyday, it would statistically be over 21,000 years before he or she would be killed. The lifetime odds of any individual in the US dying in a car accident is about 1 in 80. That same individual’s lifetime odds of dying in a plane crash is about 1 in 55,000.

Dec 10, 2012 5:56pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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