Navy identifies SEAL killed in hostage rescue in Afghanistan

Tue Dec 11, 2012 1:23am EST

Navy SEAL Petty Officer 1st Class Nicolas D. Checque is shown in this undated family photo provided by the U.S. Navy. Checque, 28, of Monroeville, Pennsylvania, died of combat related injuries suffered on December 8, while supporting operations near Kabul, Afghanistan. Checque was assigned to an East Coast-based Naval Special Warfare unit. REUTERS/U.S. Navy/Handout

Navy SEAL Petty Officer 1st Class Nicolas D. Checque is shown in this undated family photo provided by the U.S. Navy. Checque, 28, of Monroeville, Pennsylvania, died of combat related injuries suffered on December 8, while supporting operations near Kabul, Afghanistan. Checque was assigned to an East Coast-based Naval Special Warfare unit.

Credit: Reuters/U.S. Navy/Handout

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(Reuters) - A U.S. Navy SEAL was killed in Sunday's rescue mission in Afghanistan that freed an American doctor kidnapped by the Taliban, the Defense Department said on Monday.

Petty Officer 1st Class Nicolas Checque, 28, of Monroeville, Pennsylvania, died of combat-related injuries, according to a statement that gave no further details. He was assigned to an East Coast-based Naval Special Warfare unit.

Dr. Dilip Joseph, the U.S. citizen rescued on Sunday, was abducted on Wednesday in the Sarobi district of Afghanistan's Kabul province, according to NATO-led forces.

U.S. General John Allen, commander of NATO-led foreign forces in Afghanistan, said he ordered the mission in eastern Afghanistan when intelligence showed that Joseph was "in imminent danger of injury or death."

"The special operators who conducted this raid knew they were putting their lives on the line to free a fellow American from the enemy's grip," Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said in a statement released by the Pentagon.

"They put the safety of another American ahead of their own, as so many of our brave warriors do every day and every night."

(Reporting by Lisa Shumaker; Additional reporting by Phil Stewart and Paul Eckert; Editing by Eric Walsh)

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Comments (3)
ejpearcy wrote:
God bless the soul of that brave American soldier!

One question arises though and that is what was so special about that particular doctor? Do we send Seal Team 6 after every kidnapped American now? Only kidnapped American doctors? Only some kind of “special” person who’s a doctor? Or was he a spy for us violating Geneva accords by concealing his spy duties under the rubric of a benevolent doctor?

It really makes me wonder. Anyone else curious about this?

Dec 11, 2012 2:31am EST  --  Report as abuse
Tiu wrote:
It’s tragic these young men and women are still dying for no particularly good reason.

Dec 11, 2012 3:14am EST  --  Report as abuse
AbrahamsSons wrote:
I agree with ejpearcy, one must ask why the life of this one doctor was more important than the lives of the highly trained solders that rescued him?

Rest in peace Nicolas Checque. My sincere condolences go out to your family and friends.

Rest assured Dr. Dilip Joseph, your life can go on. Why?

Dec 11, 2012 3:21am EST  --  Report as abuse
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