Japan opposition LDP wins in a landslide: exit polls

TOKYO Sun Dec 16, 2012 6:19am EST

Japan's main opposition Liberal Democratic Party's (LDP) leader and former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe raises his hands atop a campaign van at Akihabara electronics store district in Tokyo December 15, 2012, on the last election campaign day ahead of Sunday's general election. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao

Japan's main opposition Liberal Democratic Party's (LDP) leader and former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe raises his hands atop a campaign van at Akihabara electronics store district in Tokyo December 15, 2012, on the last election campaign day ahead of Sunday's general election.

Credit: Reuters/Yuriko Nakao

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TOKYO (Reuters) - Japan's conservative Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) won a landslide victory in Sunday's election for parliament's lower house, TV exit polls showed, returning it to power after a three-year-hiatus with ex-Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at the helm.

An LDP win will usher in a government committed to a tough stance in a territorial row with China, a pro-nuclear power energy policy despite last year's Fukushima disaster, and a radical recipe of hyper-easy monetary policy and big fiscal spending to end persistant deflation and tame a strong yen.

The LDP was to win 296 seats in the 480-member lower house, while its ally, the New Komeito was to win 32 seats, TV Asahi's exit poll showed. That would give them the two-thirds majority needed to over-ride the upper house and break a policy deadlock that has plagued successive governments for half a decade.

The victory will give the 58-year-old Abe, who quit the top job in 2007 citing ill health after a troubled year in office, a second shot at running the world's third-biggest economy.

The ruling Democratic Party of Japan would get only 65 seats, the TV Asahi exit poll showed. The new right-leaning Japan Restoration Party would get 46 seats. Exit polls by other broadcasters were broadly in line those forecasts.

(Reporting by Linda Sieg; Editing by Edmund Klamann)

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