World Bank raises E.Asia outlook, sees China growing 8.4 pct in 2013

SINGAPORE Tue Dec 18, 2012 8:59pm EST

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SINGAPORE Dec 19 (Reuters) - The World Bank raised its 2013 economic growth forecasts for China and developing East Asia on Wednesday, and said the region remained resilient despite the lacklustre performance of the global economy.

"For 2013, we expect the region to benefit from continued strong domestic demand and a mild global recovery that would nudge the contribution of net exports to growth back into positive territory, a trend projected to continue into 2014," the World Bank said in its latest East Asia and Pacific Economic Update.

"Most countries in the region have retained their strong macroeconomic fundamentals and should be able to withstand external shocks," it added, although it warned of risks such as a sharp drop in investment growth in China that could shake global confidence and a U.S. failure to reach an agreement on tax increases and spending cuts before the end of the year.

The World Bank said China was expected to expand by 8.4 percent next year, fuelled by fiscal stimulus and the faster implementation of large investment projects. The latest forecast is higher than the 8.1 percent figure cited in an October report.

"The slowdown in the Chinese economy appears to now have bottomed out. While third quarter growth, at 7.4 percent year-on-year, is still low compared to last year, quarter-on-quarter growth has picked up notably, reaching 9.1 percent in the third quarter at a seasonally-adjusted, annualised rate," the World Bank said.

Growth in the world's most populous nation is, however, expected to slow to around 8 percent in 2014, with the potential pace of economic expansion gradually declining as productivity and labour force growth tail off.

For developing East Asia as a whole, next year's growth is expected to come in at 7.9 percent, up from an earlier forecast of 7.6 percent, with the Philippines and Malaysia growing by 6.2 percent and 5.0 percent, respectively.

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