HBO's Liberace film aims to humanize through love story

PASADENA, California Fri Jan 4, 2013 10:24pm EST

Actor Michael Douglas takes part in a panel discussion of HBO's ''Behind The Candelabra'' during the 2013 Winter Press Tour for the Television Critics Association in Pasadena, California, January 4, 2013. REUTERS/Gus Ruelas

Actor Michael Douglas takes part in a panel discussion of HBO's ''Behind The Candelabra'' during the 2013 Winter Press Tour for the Television Critics Association in Pasadena, California, January 4, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Gus Ruelas

Photo

Paris Fashion Week

Collection highlights from Paris.  Slideshow 

PASADENA, California (Reuters) - Michael Douglas takes on larger-than-life entertainer Liberace as he plays the singer in an HBO film about a secret love affair in the 1970s that Douglas on Friday called "a great love story."

Director Steven Soderbergh said he chose to tell Liberace's story through the lens of his romance with Scott Thorson - a young man who walked into the singer's Las Vegas dressing room in the summer of 1977 - in part to expand public perception beyond his outsized personality and lavish lifestyle.

"I was very anxious that we not make a caricature of either of their characters or the relationship," Soderbergh told reporters at a meeting of the Television Critics Association.

"The discussions they're having are discussions every couple has. We take the relationship very seriously," he said.

The film called "Beyond the Candelabra" debuts this spring on Time Warner Inc-owned HBO. It is based on Thorson's book of the same name about their relationship, which ended in a bitter breakup. Matt Damon plays Thorson.

The idea for the film was budding 12 years ago, when Soderbergh and the "Wall Street" actor were working on the 2000 movie "Traffic." Soderbergh randomly asked Douglas if he had ever thought of playing Liberace.

Douglas said he thought "is this guy messing with me?," but launched into an impersonation that stuck with Soderbergh years later when he began envisioning the Liberace film.

The movie depicts "a great love story," Douglas said.

"This is a couple that felt for each other. There's a lot of joyful moments; there is humor to it," until their emotional split, he said.

Liberace tried to keep his relationship with Thorson from the public. When Thorson sued Liberace for palimony after their breakup, the entertainer denied that he was gay or that the two had been lovers.

"It's unfortunate to see the movie through a contemporary lens and know they were not allowed to be as open back then as people are today," Soderbergh said.

Liberace died in 1987 at age 67.

The filmmakers used locations and props directly from Liberace's life. Scenes were filmed at the musician's Los Angeles penthouse and on the stage at the Las Vegas Hilton where Liberace performed. The filmmakers also reunited his trademark, matching "Dueling Pianos."

The movie's costume designers worked to recreate his elaborate costumes. In one of the star's dramatic entrances, the real-life Liberace wore a $300,000 white virgin fox coat, lined with $100,000 worth of Austrian crystals, that weighed 100 lbs (45 kg). In the film, Douglas wears a replica made of fake fur that weighs much less.

Damon also got to wear his share of flashy outfits. While he said he normally doesn't pay too much attention to wardrobe fittings, he said he embraced the glamorous costumes in the Liberace film.

"I probably spent more time in wardrobe fittings in this thing than I have in the previous 15 projects," he said. "I really enjoyed it."

(Reporting by Lisa Richwine, editing by Jill Serjeant and Lisa Shumaker)

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/
Comments (3)
GuytanoParks wrote:
Liberace was a PIANIST, not a singer. Although he sometimes sang (usually the closing number of his show, I’ll Be Seeing You), calling him a singer in the article’s opening sentence seems to be a very obvious/ignorant typo.

Jan 04, 2013 10:59pm EST  --  Report as abuse
newyorkartist wrote:
When the director uses the word “respectful” does that equate to “accurate” ? Or is the image that Liberace had in his head of himself what is being “respected” ? Do tell.

Is “outsized personality” reporter coded language for flamboyant ?

“It’s unfortunate to see the movie through a contemporary lens and know they were not allowed to be as open back then as people are today,” Soderbergh said.

Did either man: Liberace or Scott Thorson really believe that they were being perceived as not-gay by an intelligent public.

“Not allowed” by whom ? The government, their family, their Hollywood manager or publicist ?

Mr. Soderberg please read “In the Flesh: Undressing for Success” by Gavin Geoffrey Dillard or read Dominick Dunne’s “letter” or google that other billionaire’s yacht trips: people have always been open about their homosexuality, except those who remain in the closet for their own reasons. The time has nothing to do with coming out as gay: only a person’s integrity and being honest with him/her-self and others.

Jan 04, 2013 11:33pm EST  --  Report as abuse
boredalways wrote:
@newyorkartist,
Maybe you should just watch the film and judge for yourself. Does the overreaction of Spike Lee to “Django Unchained” or the Catholic church to “The Last Temptation of Christ” ring a bell?

Jan 05, 2013 10:41am EST  --  Report as abuse
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.