Boeing increases 737 production rate

NEW YORK Tue Jan 29, 2013 3:02pm EST

Related Topics

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Boeing Co (BA.N) said Tuesday it had increased the production rate for its next-generation 737 jetliner on schedule, aiming to turn out 38 planes a month, even as its larger 787 jet faces potential delays due to battery failures earlier this month.

Boeing said its 737 line will increase from the current 35 planes a month, with the first plane built under the higher rate due to be delivered in the second quarter. The rate is scheduled to increase to 42 a month in 2014.

Boeing is due to release fourth-quarter and full-year earnings on Wednesday, and while it likely finished the year with a solid performance, analysts are expected to focus on the potential cost of the 787 problems, which have prompted regulators to ground the plane worldwide.

The ramp-up in 737 production shows the company is continuing to produce its other planes on schedule. The 787 line also is on schedule, producing five planes a month, and plans call for the rate to rise to 10 a month this year. However, Boeing has stopped delivering the planes until problems that caused to batteries to burn on the planes are solved.

(Reporting by Alwyn Scott; Editing by Bob Burgdorfer)

FILED UNDER:
We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/
Comments (1)
PseudoTurtle wrote:
From the UK Guardian –

Boeing 787: regulators admit bafflement over source of aircraft’s fault

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2013/jan/28/boeing-787-regulators-investigation-source-fault

Boeing 737: On a wing and a prayer

http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/peopleandpower/2010/12/20101214104637901849.html

Jan 29, 2013 3:55pm EST  --  Report as abuse
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.