China's narrow focus on oil in South Sudan won't work: U.S. envoy

WASHINGTON Wed Jan 30, 2013 10:10pm EST

Newly appointed U.S. special envoy for Sudan Princeton Lyman speaks during a joint news conference with Sudan's Foreign Minister Ali Karti in Khartoum April 6, 2011. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

Newly appointed U.S. special envoy for Sudan Princeton Lyman speaks during a joint news conference with Sudan's Foreign Minister Ali Karti in Khartoum April 6, 2011.

Credit: Reuters/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - China needs to move beyond a narrow focus on oil issues in South Sudan and help tackle that country's larger political disputes with Sudan, the outgoing U.S. special envoy to the two African states said on Wednesday.

Ambassador Princeton Lyman said he had worked closely with Chinese officials more than two years, during which time South Sudan seceded from Sudan in 2011 to become the world's newest nation.

China is Sudan's biggest ally and is the largest investor in the oil industry there and in South Sudan - a position that Western diplomats say gives Beijing the best chance of defusing tensions between Khartoum and Juba over sharing oil wealth and ending violence on both sides of their shared boundary.

But Lyman said the disputes, which have shut down landlocked South Sudan's oil output, underscore the limits of staying aloof from political problems.

"They have weighed in very significantly on the oil issue. But what China doesn't like to do is to get involved in some of the underlying political problems that are keeping the oil from flowing," he told reporters in Washington.

"Without that stability and (with) the danger of conflict on the border, the chances of having a long-term productive oil sector is threatened, so they can't just concentrate on the oil and just pretend that the other things aren't bearing on it," he said.

China has long held up as its foreign policy mantra non-interference in countries' internal affairs, a principle it first enunciated in 1954 - long before it was an economic power with interests around the globe.

(Reporting by Paul Eckert; Editing by Cynthia Osterman)

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Comments (2)
DeanMJackson wrote:
The article reads, “China has long held up as its foreign policy mantra non-interference in countries’ internal affairs, a principle it first enunciated in 1954 – long before it was an economic power with interests around the globe.”

Then what was China doing in South Vietnam during the height of the war there? Most of the NVA regiments American ground forces fought in South Vietnam were actually Chinese regiments, where the Chinese combatants were attired in NVA uniforms.

Communist China intervenes only when it has to (as in the case of its assistance to fellow comrades in North Vietnam during the Vietnam War).
Otherwise Communist China is a signatory to the “Long-Range Policy”, the “new” strategy all Communist nations signed onto in 1960 to defeat the West with. This strategy doesn’t require China to meddle in the internal affairs of its enemies in the West (Moscow can take care of the “meddling”). China and the USSR will move against the West in one swift move when the time is right. This move will come after China itself undergoes the fake collapse of its [Communist] government, which the USSR implemented in late 1991.

Once China fakes its collapse, then watch Mexico request the “assistance” of the new “democratic” China in suppressing the then spreading “drug wars” (and fraudulent “drug wars”; the “drug wars” were inspired by Mexico City in consultation with Moscow and Beijing as a pretext for having “democratic” Chinese troops on Mexican territory) there.

Jan 31, 2013 12:40am EST  --  Report as abuse
What was China doing in South vietnam during the height of the war there? Precious, why was any other country doing in Vietname after WWII especially across the globe? It’s okay to use China as world’s sweatshop but it’s not okay for China to compete in the world stage? Chinese developed gunpowders for suppose elixir, later on fire works and limited miliary roles, ohh boy we don’t need to get into who’s the naughty one here.

Jan 31, 2013 2:27pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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