Thirty-five killed as militants attack Pakistan checkpoint

DERA ISMAIL KHAN, Pakistan Sat Feb 2, 2013 5:27pm EST

Policemen stand guard as they cordon the road leading to an isolated army checkpoint after it was attacked by militants at Lakki Marwat in the outskirts of Dera Ismail Khan February 2, 2013. REUTERS/Zahid Mohammad

Policemen stand guard as they cordon the road leading to an isolated army checkpoint after it was attacked by militants at Lakki Marwat in the outskirts of Dera Ismail Khan February 2, 2013.

Credit: Reuters/Zahid Mohammad

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DERA ISMAIL KHAN, Pakistan (Reuters) - Militants attacked an isolated army checkpoint in Pakistan's restive northwest on Saturday, with at least 35 people killed in the initial assault, subsequent crossfire and a rocket attack on a house, officials said.

The Pakistan Taliban claimed responsibility, saying the attack was in response to a U.S. drone strike in neighboring North Waziristan last month in which two commanders were killed.

The Pakistani military and pro-government militias have since 2009 regained territory from the Pakistan Taliban, who once controlled land a few hours' drive from the capital of Islamabad.

The militants attacked the post at Lakki Marwat early on Saturday.

A security official said 12 militants and 13 soldiers were killed in the clash. Two bodies had suicide bomb belts on them.

"Cross-firing between militants and security officials continued for four hours," one source said.

The militants also targeted a house next to the camp with rockets, killing 10 members of one family, including three children, the official said.

"Pakistan has been co-operating with the U.S. in its drone strikes that killed our two senior commanders, Faisal Khan and Toofani, and the attack on military camp was the revenge of their killing," the Taliban spokesman said.

He said four suicide bombers attacked the camp and blew themselves up. He said more than a dozen soldiers were killed.

(Additional reporting by Jibran Ahmad in Peshawar, Javed Hussain in Parachinar and Mubasher Bukhari in Islamabad; Writing by Nick Macfie; Editing by Sanjeev Miglani)

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Comments (2)
americanguy wrote:
Most other countries would get really angry over this and go to war with Al Qaeda, Taliban, and other militants in their country.
Not Pakistan, their policy is to ignore terrorists (and in some cases help them) and hope they don’t cause trouble.
You would think Pakistan would realize their “maybe if we ignore them they will go away” policy, is not working.
Basically Pakistan is out of control and a country of criminals.
You lie down with dogs, you get fleas.

Feb 02, 2013 12:14pm EST  --  Report as abuse
Robocop5626 wrote:
An out of control country of criminals with access to nuclear weapons! That can’t be good in the long run…

Feb 02, 2013 12:48pm EST  --  Report as abuse
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