UPDATE 4-Humana quarterly profit falls, flu season to cost $75 mln

Mon Feb 4, 2013 10:56am EST

* Humana profit of $1.19 a share beats Wall St view of $1.06
    * Backs 2013 return to growth
    * Worst flu in a decade to cost $0.20 per share in 2013
    * First-quarter outlook beats, shares rise


    By Caroline Humer
    Feb 4 (Reuters) - Health insurer Humana Inc reported
a drop in fourth-quarter profits on Monday and said it was
experiencing the worst flu season in a decade that would cost
$75 million for added healthcare services such as
hospitalizations.
    Its profits beat analyst expectations, however, and it gave
a better-than-expected first quarter outlook. Shares rose $3.12,
or 4.1 percent, to $78.47 in early trading. 
    The company said on Monday net income had fallen to $192
million, or $1.19 a share, from $199 million, or $1.20 per
share, a year earlier.
    Analysts on average had expected earnings of $1.06 per
share, according to Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S.  
    Fourth-quarter revenue rose 6 percent to $9.56 billion from
$9.06 billion, missing the analysts' average estimate of $9.73
billion.
    Humana said it expected first-quarter earnings of $1.75 to
$1.85 per share, compared with analysts' expectations of $1.53. 
    "It looks like they are starting the year stronger than
expected," Leerink Swann analyst Jason Gurda said, noting the
above consensus outlook for the first quarter despite the
company's anticipated high 2013 flu costs. That was likely
helping shares, he said.
    Part of the fourth-quarter earnings beat was due to a
decline in the company's tax rate from the year-earlier quarter.
The company also said an increase for members in some plans
enabled it to be more cost efficient. 
    Costs associated with the flu peaked in the middle of
January, Chief Financial Officer Jim Bloem said during a
conference call. Humana said it spent about $25 million, or 10
cents per share, during the fourth quarter and it expects to
spend another $50 million, or 20 cents per share.
    Insurers' finances can be hurt by the flu because of an
increase in claims related to visits to doctors and hospitals.
In some insurance plans, Humana is paid on a per-person rate
rather than a per-visit basis, and so it feels a financial
impact when use of medical services rises.
    Other insurers have also reported higher costs related to
the flu, which began earlier than usual this year, and will
spend hundreds of millions total by the end of the season.
 The number of positive flu tests dropped for the
fourth week in a row, according to data released by the Centers
for Disease Control on Friday.
        
    RETURN TO GROWTH IN 2013
    Humana confirmed the outlook it gave in November for 2013
earnings of $7.60 to $7.80 per share, saying it expected to
benefit from improved operating results and its Metropolitan
Health Networks Inc acquisition.
    The company forecast 2013 revenue of $41 billion to $41.5
billion, in line with Wall Street estimates.
    Louisville, Kentucky-based Humana said the costs of
providing benefits in its retail business had risen, but
operating expenses for this group, combined with healthcare for
employer groups, had fallen. Operating expenses for its military
healthcare contract rose, the company said.
    Humana, which has a large business providing Medicare and
Medicaid healthcare, has been facing rising costs and downward
pressure on payments from the U.S. government for medical
services.
    Other health insurers, including UnitedHealth Group Inc
, WellPoint Inc and Aetna Inc, have also
reported on difficult conditions in their fourth-quarter
earnings. The industry is bracing for further change this year
and next as state and U.S. government-run electronic health
exchanges begin selling insurance directly to consumers and
small businesses.
    Humana said it did not expect a large number of its
customers in its small business to move to exchanges. It expects
to take part in about 10 different exchanges.
Comments (0)
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.