EURO GOVT-Debt deal sends Irish bond yields to pre-crisis levels

Thu Feb 7, 2013 12:44pm EST

Related Topics

* Irish bonds rally after ECB deal
    * Draghi plays down rise in money market rates
    * ECB says will monitor impact of euro strength
    * Markets interpret that as softer tone, Bunds rally


    By Marius Zaharia
    LONDON, Feb 7 (Reuters) - Irish government bond yields fell
on Thursday to levels last seen before the global financial
crisis after Dublin reached a deal that will reduce its
borrowing needs over the next decade.
    At the top end of the euro zone credit scale, German debt
yields fell sharply after European Central Bank President Mario
Draghi played down a rise in money market rates and said the
bank will monitor the strength of the euro. 
    The deal between Ireland and the European Central Bank to
ease the burden of debt taken to rescue its banking system puts
Ireland on track to end its reliance on bailout money and come
out of its debt crisis. 
    The ECB allowed Ireland to stretch the cost of bailing out
Anglo Irish Bank over 40 years, a move which the government
estimates will reduce the borrowing needs by 20 billion euros
over the next decade.
    "It shows there's no shortage of goodwill towards Ireland
and that's a good thing. It should lock in this improved market
sentiment in Ireland," said Chris Scicluna, head of economic
research at Daiwa Capital Markets.
    The October 2020 Irish bond yield fell as low as
3.952 percent, the lowest seen in an equivalent Irish benchmark
bond since early 2007, before the subprime crisis started,
according to Reuters data.
    Shorter-dated bond yields also fell, while the cost to
insure Irish debt against default via five-year credit default
swaps fell 17 basis points to 143 bps, according to data monitor
Markit. 
    Elsewhere in the euro zone's lower-rated periphery, Spanish
bonds erased early-session losses after a debt auction drew
better-than-expected demand. Ten-year yields were
last 2 bps lower at 5.42 percent.
    Spanish bonds took a beating earlier this week as a
corruption scandal led to calls for Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy
to resign, raising worries that Spain may delay the
implementation of reforms aimed at overcoming its debt crisis.
    Italian bonds also faced selling pressure this week as the
party led by former premier Silvio Berlusconi is gaining in
opinion polls before elections later this month, raising
concerns about the future path of reforms in one of the most
indebted countries in the world.
    Ten-year Italian bonds were last 3 bps higher
at 4.58 percent.
    Sanjay Joshi, head of fixed income at London and Capital,
sold all his Italian and Spanish bonds last week.
    "Concerns about Italian elections and also Spain made us
flatten out on the periphery about a week ago. They've had quite
a good run so we took the opportunity to take profit and we've
done pretty well on it," said Joshi, whose firm manages about
$1.5 billion in fixed income assets.
ΕΎ
    DRAGHI'S HINTS
    After the ECB left interest rates unchanged at 0.75 percent,
Draghi said he will monitor the impact of a strengthening euro
on the economy and cautioned against reading too much into a
rise in overnight interbank Eonia rates.
    Draghi estimated that, even after the initial repayments of
the second of the ECB's LTRO crisis loans, excess liquidity
would not drop below 200 billion euros - the level at which
overnight borrowing costs typically begin to rise.
    "It's bullish ... he is hinting that if policy does get
tighter from the payback then he will do something about
that.(Also) he was more concerned about the euro. That means
that if the euro goes up the market can expect some reaction,"
RBS rate strategist Harvinder Sian said.
    German Bund yields fell 2.2 basis points to
1.609 percent, while two-year yields fell 3.4 bps
to 0.177 percent. Sian said Schatz yields could fall by about 10
basis points in the near term due to Draghi's comments.
FILED UNDER:
Comments (0)
This discussion is now closed. We welcome comments on our articles for a limited period after their publication.

A tourist takes a plunge as she swims at Ngapali Beach, a popular tourist site, in the Thandwe township of the Rakhine state, October 6, 2013. Picture taken October 6, 2013. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun (MYANMAR - Tags: SOCIETY) - RTR3FOI0

Where do you want to go?

We look at when to take trips, budget considerations and the popularity of multigenerational family travel.   Video