Ford sees no big impact on February sales due to Northeast storm

ORLANDO, Florida Sun Feb 10, 2013 1:58pm EST

The logo of Ford Motor Company is seen on vehicles in a parking lot at the Ford assembly plant in Genk October 23, 2012. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir

The logo of Ford Motor Company is seen on vehicles in a parking lot at the Ford assembly plant in Genk October 23, 2012.

Credit: Reuters/Francois Lenoir

ORLANDO, Florida (Reuters) - Ford Motor Co (F.N) sees no major impact on February U.S. auto sales due to the weekend storm that hit the Northeast, a company executive said on Sunday.

Ken Czubay, head of U.S. sales, service and marketing for Ford, said that unlike Superstorm Sandy that struck the same area last October, no significant infrastructure damage is expected.

Czubay made his comments to reporters on the sidelines of the annual convention of the National Automobile Dealers Association.

Sandy took as many as 200,000 new vehicles out of the market because of damage, NADA Chief Economist Paul Taylor said.

Automakers said that sales lost in October and early November because of Sandy were regained in the following couple of months.

(Reporting by Bernie Woodall; Editing by Dale Hudson)

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