PRESS DIGEST - Wall Street Journal - Feb 21

Thu Feb 21, 2013 3:14am EST

Feb 21 (Reuters) - The following are the top stories in the Wall Street Journal. Reuters has not verified these stories and does not vouch for their accuracy.

* federal Reserve officials, uneasy with potential risks springing from the central bank's low-interest-rate policies, are split over an early retreat from the experimental programs created to revive the U.S. economy.

* Citigroup Inc's Michael E. O'Neill was among a small group of directors who after the financial crisis urged the company to weigh the pros and cons of splitting up the third-largest U.S. bank, said people familiar with the deliberations.

* Boeing Co is expected to launch a formal plan on Friday to get its grounded Dreamliner back into service, presenting fixes aimed at reducing fire hazards from the jetliner's batteries, according to people familiar with the details.

* A financial-industry regulator is expected to discuss the possibility of banning Jon Corzine, former chief executive of MF Global Holdings Ltd, for life from the futures industry, according to people involved in the process.

* Office Depot Inc and OfficeMax Inc agreed to merge, but the unveiling of the accord was marred by a premature announcement of the deal.

* Sony Corp moved to reinvent its PlayStation videogame console, demonstrating faster, graphics-rich hardware with new Internet-based features to counter stiff competition from the Web and mobile devices.

* The White House threatened China and other countries with trade and diplomatic action over corporate espionage as it cataloged more than a dozen cases of cyberattacks and commercial thefts at some of the biggest U.S. companies.

* Maurice Taylor, the chief executive of Titan International Inc, which had considered buying a tire factory in northern France, wrote to France's industry minister, saying he would be "stupid" to operate in a country where workers get high wages for little actual work. French unions and the government do nothing but talk, Taylor said.

* Key U.S. senators are exploring an immigration bill that would force every U.S. worker - citizen or not - to carry a high-tech identity card to prove a person's legal eligibility to work.

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